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No toll… but walkers donate €100,000

No toll… but walkers donate €100,000

first_imgPrint Advertisement Previous articleMoyross land deal failsNext articleSummer festival guide admin Email Linkedin Facebookcenter_img WhatsApp Twitter NewsLocal NewsNo toll… but walkers donate €100,000By admin – June 24, 2010 415 THERE may not have been a toll charge, but the estimated 30,000 plus, who walked the Limerick Tunnel last weekend, sank an estimated €100,000 into collection buckets for local charities.The brainchild of both Limerick and Shannon Rotary clubs, collection points were strategically placed on the route, and according to one club member, tunnel walkers were more than generous.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Said a Rotary member: “One lady came along with a bag full of coins. We haven’t counted the value yet, but it looks substantial.“Notes of various denominations were dipped into our buckets….it seemed that just about everybody wanted to donate. It was an historic occasion, of course, for Limerick. The weather was most favourable and everybody was in good mood…. there was no hint of recession. The atmosphere was like Croke Park on All-Ireland final day”.  There was a possibility, he continued, that the fund might even top the €100,000 mark.“We are still counting…we were weighed down with cash and thankfully, all Limerick charities will be beneficiaries. We did not anticipate such a response”.The same source had a tip for those engaged in tourism.“At the entrance to the tunnel on the Dock Road side, there are two magnificent lakes, of which few, other than locals, could have been aware until now. There was an abundance of wildlife there last weekend, and now that the site has opened up, maybe they could now be highlighted”.last_img read more

Proptech lettings platform and landlord mortgage service join forces

Proptech lettings platform and landlord mortgage service join forces

first_imgHome » News » Proptech lettings platform and landlord mortgage service join forces previous nextProducts & ServicesProptech lettings platform and landlord mortgage service join forcesTeclet, which announced its partnership with MAB in August, says agents can now offer landlords a mortgage and remortgage service as part of the tenancy set-up process.Nigel Lewis16th April 20200388 Views Fast-growing lettings platform Teclet has struck a deal with mortgage broking giant MAB to plug its home loans and protection advice service into the platform.Teclet users now have access to MAB’s ninety-plus lenders and also its advice across all areas including buy-to-let, re-mortgages or income protection as they move through a lettings transaction.If an agent does not currently have access to these services via a provider, then the Teclet platform will now give them access to the MAB service.The partnership will initially be offered as a separate ‘bolt on’ from MAB before soon becoming a single, seamless service.John Evans, Director at Teclet (left), says: “The Teclet platform is a game changer and is already helping all stakeholders in the lettings and management process with its unique capabilities.“Over 40% of interactions take place outside of normal business hours and this, particularly in today’s difficult environment, is proving to be immensely valuable to all parties.“Extending our partnership arrangements with MAB sees us facilitating mortgage and protection advice and enabling landlords and tenants to get the right products to help them maximise their investment and personal goals.”Teclet was launched in 2016 and automates many aspects of the lettings process to reduce overheads and maximise operational efficiencies for letting agents.In December last year it was given a significant boost when OnTheMarket has made its first direct investment in a proptech company following its purchase of a 20% share in Glanty, the company behind Teclet, for £797,000.   John Evans teclet proptech MAB Peter Brodnicki Mortgage Advice Bureau teclet April 16, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

Mishcon de Reya: Navigating the industry’s ‘Enforcement Action’ plan

Mishcon de Reya: Navigating the industry’s ‘Enforcement Action’ plan

first_imgShare UKGC launches fourth National Lottery licence competition August 28, 2020 Winning Post: Swedish regulator pushes back on ‘Storebror’ approach to deposit limits August 24, 2020 Share Related Articles Submit Leading international law firm Mishcon de Reya details in-depth insight and stakeholder advice on mitigating the industry’s upcoming ‘Enforcement Action’. Outlining precautions online incumbents should be taking/assessing to reduce the risk of a compliance assessment becoming a licence review.Document authored by: Niki Stephens – Managing Associate, Mishcon de Reya LLPNick Nocton– Partner, Mishcon de Reya LLPMatthew Hancock– Legal Director, Mishcon de Reya LLP____________________On 13 February, the Committees of Advertising Practice (CAP) released new guidance which comes into force on 1 April 2019. The new guidance aims to further protect children and young people from irresponsible gambling advertising by providing greater detail on approaches that are likely to be unacceptable in individual marketing communications.Only a week prior to this, the UK Gambling Commission (UKGC) announced changes to the Licence Conditions and Codes of Practice aimed at making gambling safer and fairer. Among other things, these new rules require operators to verify the name, address and date of birth of customers before allowing them to gamble, ask for additional verification information promptly, inform customers (before they deposit funds) of the types of identity document or other information that might be required, the circumstances in which such information might be required and how it should be supplied and take reasonable steps to ensure that information on the identity of their customers remains accurate. These changes will come into effect on 7 May 2019.These recent developments are against a backdrop of ongoing regulatory action by the UKGC against online casino operators. At the end of 2018, regulatory action against two online casino operators resulted in financial penalty payments totalling £13m, with the commission further placing six licensed incumbents under investigation.The UKGC is taking decisive action and online operators can ill afford to assume that the gambling authority will not come knocking at their door… Proactivity is essential! Most businesses are aware of their limitations, but it is now more important than ever to take steps to address those weaknesses. We have advised a number of online operators following compliance assessments and (in a number of instances) consequential licence reviews. From our experience, self-diagnosis and addressing weaknesses is a valuable exercise. The better prepared an operator is for self-assessment, the better placed it will be to mitigate against the risk of it resulting in a licence review which could ultimately lead to a sanction.We, therefore, urge all online operators to work through the UKGC’s compliance health check, to implement any necessary changes, and:Consider how they would demonstrate to the UKGC that compliance sits firmly at the heart of the business – the commission expects licensees to be able to provide evidence of this and to demonstrate that leadership takes an active interest and role in compliance matters. For due-diligence purposes, keeping records of meetings at which compliance matters have been meaningfully discussed/debated should be standard practice.  Depending on the size and structure of the business, operators should also consider whether it would be appropriate to appoint a compliance committee.Create an internal ‘compliance calendar’ – although key compliance policies will inevitably require more frequent review, by implementing a calendar that alerts all relevant staff to upcoming compliance milestones, operators can (for example) ensure that, at least annually, all key compliance policies are reviewed in detail and audited to ensure ongoing adequacy and effectiveness. Operators should also consider engaging external advisors to review and audit the adequacy and effectiveness of key compliance policies and procedures.Keep records on all levels of staff training, not just training related to AML disciplines.  Logs are good evidence of all induction and ongoing training received by staff and enable the operator to ensure regular training is received. Operators should also assess the nature of training delivered to staff and ensure that a mix of in-house and external training is delivered.Conduct regular reviews of its ‘top’, highest risk, customers and involve the nominated and deputy nominated officers in those reviews – these reviews should be recorded in a system that informs all relevant staff of the status of the customer in question and the outcome of the review (including all customer service, VIP, compliance and responsible gambling staff). These reviews should help ensure that all necessary enhanced due diligence has been collected, stored and updated and should assist the operator in objectively assessing the effectiveness of their anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing policies, including the suitability of any financial triggers implemented to identify higher risk players.Ensure that its systems are sophisticated enough to enable system logs to be maintained, which allow interactions with customers to be recorded and reviewed (in real time) to ensure effective decision-making by customer service, responsible gambling and compliance staff. These logs will also be valuable during any internal or external audit during which the effectiveness of the relevant policies and procedures is assessed. The UKGC is also likely to ask for evidence of customer interactions during any compliance assessment.This list is not intended to be exhaustive. It is a sample of a variety of steps that operators should be taking in preparation for any compliance assessment. Failure to take any preparatory steps would be unwise and benchmarking compliance against peers is not a prudent position to take.________________Niki Stephens will be speaking on this subject at Betting on Football, which is being held at Stamford Bridge 19-22 March. For more information, click here. UKGC hails ‘delivered efficiencies’ of its revamped licence maintenance service  August 20, 2020 StumbleUponlast_img read more

Giroud eyes Chelsea chance after bruising full debut

Giroud eyes Chelsea chance after bruising full debut

first_imgHe had been struggling with a calf injury, having already had five stitches for a cut when taking studs to the head, but his manager Antonio Conte expects him to be fit for Friday’s FA Cup fifth-round fixture with Hull.“It’s been a while since I played regularly and that’s why I needed to move,” said Giroud, who was replaced by Chelsea’s summer signing Alvaro Morata. “I needed a new challenge and Chelsea was the perfect club for me.“It’s the Premier League, a club which has won more titles in the past 10 years than any other. It’s a massive club and I am very proud to be here and to carry on my career.“I feel very good. It’s been maybe two months since I started a game so I felt good. I worked hard in training to be physically ready and to do what the coach asked me to do tactically. There is still room for improvement but I take a lot of pleasure from (my performance) and I’m happy to set the first goal for Eden.”The 31-year-old said he was focused on Chelsea after “five amazing years” at Arsenal.“I said at half-time when they put stitches in my head that I wanted to carry on, but the calf was very painful and I couldn’t play the whole game,” he added.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Chelsea’s French striker Olivier Giroud holds a head bandage after getting caught in a challenge during the English Premier League match against West Bromwich Albion at Stamford Bridge in London on February 12, 2018 © AFP / Glyn KIRKLONDON, United Kingdom, Feb 13 – Olivier Giroud is focused on nailing down a first-team place at Chelsea after a dramatic full debut against West Brom, during which he was forced to have five stitches for a head wound.The France striker, who moved from Arsenal for £18 million ($25 million) last month, impressed during Monday’s 3-0 win against West Brom at Stamford Bridge, where he created the first of Eden Hazard’s two goals before being substituted in the second half.last_img read more

Local Roundup: CR steeplechaser Joseph Esparza signs on to run at University of Redlands

Local Roundup: CR steeplechaser Joseph Esparza signs on to run at University of Redlands

first_imgEureka >> From Redwoods to Redlands.College of the Redwoods runner Joseph Esparza, last season’s NorCal champion in the steeplechase, signed a letter of intent on Tuesday afternoon to attend the University of Redlands in Southern California come the start of the 2017-18 school year.Esparza, a Eureka native who ran at Arcata High School, ran cross-country in the fall at CR after finishing up his two years of eligibility on the Corsairs’ track team last spring.He credits Redwoods head coach …last_img read more

Cell Operations Amaze, Inspire

Cell Operations Amaze, Inspire

first_img An analysis of complexes with large chimeric oligonucleotides shows that the basic tails of both proteins are attached flexibly, enabling them to bind rigid duplex DNA segments extending from the core in different directions. Our results indicate that the basic tails of DEAD-box proteins contribute to RNA-chaperone activity by binding nonspecifically to large RNA substrates and flexibly tethering the core for the unwinding of neighboring duplexes. Electric cells:  You’ve heard of electric eels; how about electric bacteria?  Researchers at Harvard, publishing in Science, were curious about the electrical properties of cells: Antenna tower construction crew:  Cilia are complex organelles in the cell membrane that protrude into the intercellular medium, where they can sense the surroundings and perform other functions.  Some are motile, like the cilia in the human respiratory tract that sweep foreign matter out with coordinated strokes.  Cells build cilia using molecular ore-carts powered by kinesin-2 motors in a process called intra-flagellar transport (IFT), in which components are hoisted up into the cilium on trackways.  Scientists suspected that additional factors regulate the construction of cilia.  Now, two American molecular biologists publishing in Current Biology identified one such member of the construction crew, named KLP6, that moves independently of kinesin-2 and acts to reduce its velocity.  Note: they found this in a particular kind of cell in a roundworm. Gatekeeper dance:  Ion channels play many vital roles in our bodies.  According to Science Daily, they are “essential for the regulation of important biological processes such as smooth muscle tone and neuronal excitability.”  One such channel, named BK, performs large conductance of potassium ions in the presence of calcium ions.  Scientists had thought that all ion channels followed a unified theory of activation.  Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have found that BK channels are not that simple.  DNA orchestra:  An article on PhysOrg about DNA translation begins, “Just like orchestra musicians waiting for their cue, RNA polymerase II molecules are poised at the start site of many developmentally controlled genes, waiting for the ‘Go!’-signal to read their part of the genomic symphony.”  Researchers at Stowers Institute for Medical Research found that Super Elongation Complex (SEC), an assembly of some 10 transcription elongation factors, conveys the downbeat to the translation machine and “helps paused RNA polymerases to come online and start transcribing the gene ahead”.  This quick-start device “reduces the number of steps required for productive transcription and allows cells to respond quickly to internal and external signals,” one of the researchers explained.  Continuing the orchestra metaphor, the article said, “Transcriptional control by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a tightly orchestrated, multistep process that requires the concerted action of a large number of players to successfully transcribe the full length of genes.” Quality control inspectors:  At the exit gate of the ribosome, where new proteins have just been assembled, molecular machines called chaperones stand at the ready to help them fold properly.  A Stanford team studied two of these, the Signal Recognition Particle (SNP) and Nascent Chain associated Complex (NAC), which have the remarkable ability to work on a wide variety of proteins, helping them fold properly.  Publishing in PLoS Biology, they said, The Science Daily article reported that a team at Howard Hughes Medical Institute produced the highest-resolution diagram ever of a sodium channel .  In this excerpt, you can sense the fascination as the team looked down the channel for the first time in such detail: “We hope to gain insight into why they selectively let in sodium ions and nothing else,” the researchers said, “and how they respond to changes in the cell membrane voltage, how they open and close, and how they generate electrical signals.”  The researchers have already spotted intriguing molecular movement, such as rolling motions of some functional parts of the sodium channel molecule and their connectors…. Bacterial membrane potential provides a major component of the driving force for oxidative phosphorylation, membrane transport, and flagellar motion. Yet this voltage is inaccessible to techniques of conventional electrophysiology, owing to the small size of bacteria and the presence of a cell wall. Little is known about the electrophysiology of bacteria at the level of single cells. So they checked.  They observed E. coli bacteria producing electrical spikes at a rate of about one per second.  The electrical charge is generated by ion channels in the membrane that create electrical gradients, working against the natural tendency of charges to cancel out.  “Spiking was sensitive to chemical and physical perturbations and coincided with rapid efflux of a small-molecule fluorophore,” they said, “suggesting that bacterial efflux machinery may be electrically regulated.”  In other words, they were not observing a stochastic effect, but a coordinated action of many ion channels that must organize their active transport mechanisms as a unit.  They speculated that the spiking represents a stress response by the organism.  Coordinated electrical response is known in higher organisms, like electric eels and humans, but “These simple estimates show that some of the tenets of neuronal electrophysiology may need rethinking in the context of bacteria.” Salt of the cell:  If you enjoy having a healthy heart, brain and pancreas, thank your sodium channels.  Like the BK potassium channels, sodium channels regulate a wide range of physiological activities.  According to Science Daily, “Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels underlie inherited forms of epilepsy, migraine headaches, heart rhythm disturbances, periodic paralysis, and some pain syndromes.”  When the dentist numbs your gums, he is effectively blocking the local sodium channels from doing their job – sending pain messages to the brain.  “The ribosome uses two active mechanisms to unwind messenger RNA during translation.” (Nature)  “Crystal structures of [lambda] exonuclease in complex with DNA suggest an electrostatic ratchet mechanism for processivity.” (PNAS) “Mechanism of activation gating in the full-length KcsA K+ channel.” (PNAS) We further show interactions between the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase and Trp-Trp (WW) domains amplify the conduit response, and alter binding properties at the remote peptidyl-prolyl isomerase active site. These results suggest that specific input conformations can gate dynamic changes that support intraprotein communication.  Such gating may help control the propagation of chemical signals by Pin1, and other modular signaling proteins. RNA linemen:  We’ve all watched in the movies how rescue workers toss a line over a wall or pole so that they can climb up.  Something like that happens with some machines that unwind RNA.  In PNAS, a team of researchers described a helicase with the awful name “mitochondrial DEAD-box protein Mss116p” that acts as a general RNA chaperone.  (They really should give these machines better names, like the Chuck Norris Hammerlock Clamp.)  Not only does the machine clamp down on the RNA, it first latches onto it by means of a couple of tails that fasten onto the RNA, tethering the machine to its target: Transport vesicles are created when coat proteins assemble on a flat membrane, select cargo, and deform the membrane into a bud. The budded vesicle is then carried to its target organelle, where it docks by means of ‘tethers’ before undergoing membrane fusion. The vesicle coat was once thought to fall off as soon as budding was complete, but we now know the coat is important for binding the tethering factors that help the vesicle identify the correct organelle. Coat proteins and tethers must be removed before fusion can take place, but what triggers their disassembly has always been a mystery. A paper recently published in Nature now shows that, when one kind of transport vesicle docks with its target membrane, it encounters a kinase that breaks the bond between the coat proteins and the tethers, kick-starting the disassembly process. The problem she was considering was how the steps are coordinated: “how can a vesicle hang onto its coat long enough to reach its target, but shed it once it arrives?”  Part of the answer appears to be in good management.  Though not yet fully understood, “These results paint a picture of Sec23 as a master regulator of budding and fusion, participating in successive interactions that are regulated by phosphorylation.”  She added, though, that “While this is an attractive model, it may not be the whole story.”  Other protein machines interact in vital ways with Sec23.  Her diagram illustrates several pieces locking together like Lego blocks, arriving and releasing at precise times in a process reminiscent of a space shuttle docking with the space station.  This complexity undermines a claim on PhysOrg that “Endocytosis is simpler than expected.”  There, researchers in the Netherlands found a simpler model for the way the coat molecules (clathrin) rearrange from flat to spherical during the process of vesicle formation.  That’s only a minor aspect of a much larger multi-stage process involving many protein parts, and as this animation shows, the geodesic-style clathrin molecules are pretty clever little building blocks. Rubber baby copper pumper:  In “Structural biology: A platform for copper pumps,” Nigel Robinson, writing in Nature, said, “Copper is vital to most cells, but too much is lethal. The structure of a protein that pumps copper ions out of the cytosol provides insight into both the pumping mechanism and how certain mutations in the protein cause disease.”  His diagram shows a molecular machine called LpCopA, comprised of at least 5 protein domains, that safely pumps copper ions out of the cell.  First, the ions have to be delivered to the pump with special chaperone molecules that know how to handle it safely.  Inside the pump are three binding sites that deliver the ion to an L-shaped platform that gently holds the ion while undergoing conformational changes like a lever arm, ejecting the ion safely to the outside.  Then the platform resets for the next round.  Serious brain diseases can occur when these pumps are damaged by mutations. Our results provide new insights into SRP selectivity and reveal that NAC is a general cotranslational chaperone. We found surprising differential substrate specificity for the three subunits of NAC, which appear to recognize distinct features within nascent chains. Our results also revealed a partial overlap between the sets of nascent polypeptides that interact with NAC and SRP, respectively, and showed that NAC modulates SRP specificity and fidelity in vivo. These findings give us new insight into the dynamic interplay of chaperones acting on nascent chains. Stereo amplifier:  Researchers at Notre Dame and Virginia Tech found that an important signaling enzyme named Pin1 is stereoselective.  “Pin1 is a modular enzyme that accelerates the cis-trans isomerization of phosphorylated-Ser/Thr-Pro (pS/T-P) motifs found in numerous signaling proteins regulating cell growth and neuronal survival,” they wrote in PNAS, showing that conduit response differs if the enzyme binds on one channel instead of the other.  Here’s the scoop for bio-geeks: A student’s view of a cell under a light microscope is misleading.  It reveals only a tiny fraction of what is really going on.  Within that package of life, invisible to the student’s gaze, complex machines work together in cellular factories.  Signals pass back and forth in complex networks.  Libraries of code are transcribed and translated into machine parts.  Security guards open and close gates, and emergency response teams repair damage.  Even a simple bacterial cell has the equivalent of a city council, library, fire department, police department, industrial center, transportation infrastructure, disposal and recycling center, civil defense system and much more.  Here are just a few snippets from recent scientific papers that zoom in past the microscope lens to reveal wonders unimagined just a few decades ago. Halfway down in the activation channel, a certain amino acid residue M314 in one of the transmembrane proteins does a little dance, “rotating its side chain from a position in the closed state not exposed to the hydrophilic pore to one that is so exposed in the open state.”  This conformational change is part of a larger validation process that ensures only the right ions make it through the selectivity filter.  M314 “might not actually form the part of the activation gate that blocks ion passage, but that motions in the deep pore may be required for blocking ion passage elsewhere in the channel,”  the article explained.  So much for unified theories; “Importantly, they say, the study demonstrates that BK channel activation is not an open-and-shut case as previously suspected.” Readers may wish to investigate these additional papers published this month with intriguing titles: Dirigible doughboys:  Sometimes cells build dirigible-like “transport vesicles” out of parts of the cell membrane, to float large cargo molecules to other organelles in the cell.  This complex process involves many players, including proteins that coat the vesicle, and dockers that hold the dirigible when it comes in for landing; in the case of the cell, though, the dirigible’s coat fuses with the target organelle, so that the contents can enter safely through a membrane tunnel.  Elizabeth Conibear [U of British Columbia] introduced some of the complexity of this process, called endocytosis, in Current Biology, saying, “When a coated transport vesicle docks with its target membrane, the coat proteins and docking machinery must be released before the membranes can fuse. A recent paper shows how this disassembly is triggered at precisely the right time.”  The first paragraph of her review article described just a fraction of what goes on in these operations: Time does not permit referencing all these papers; click on the links to go to the abstracts.  These represent part of the backlog of papers on cellular wonders.  Each of them deserve a complete discussion.  Many of them talk about how parts are “highly conserved [i.e., unevolved] from bacteria to humans,” and none of them attempt even a minimally-plausible account of how they might have emerged by chance.  In these exciting days of opening the cellular black box, we should be standing in awe of the design (and the Designer), not ascribing the machinery inside to mindless, purposeless nothingness.  The record speaks for itself.  Researchers need Darwin like alcoholics need wine (Dar-wine).  It turns them into WINOs, Wesearchers In Name Only (to be pronounced with a drunken drawl).(Visited 25 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Pick n Pay in Zimbabwe expansion deal

Pick n Pay in Zimbabwe expansion deal

first_img10 April 2013 South African retailer Pick n Pay is expanding its presence in Zimbabwe through its partnership with TM Supermarkets, a subsidiary of Meikles Limited, by investing US$25-million to upgrade the chain to international standards. There are 50 TM Supermarkets across Zimbabwe, including two which already carry the Pick n Pay name at the Kamfinsa and Westgate shopping centres in the country’s capital, Harare. Pick n Pay has owned a 49% stake of TM Supermarkets since November 2010, and has provided operational support through a skills development programme to equip the Zimbabwean local team with international best practice. “[It is] wonderful news for stakeholders as it will re-position TM Supermarkets as a leader in a very competitive industry,” executive chairperson of Meikles Limited, John Moxon, said in a statement last week. “Precise timelines are not yet finalised but we shall both renovate current stores throughout the country and open new ones initially in Harare, to world-class standards.” The investment and refurbishment follows the chain’s six-fold increase in profits through improved management practices and better stock control, merchandising and buying strategies. “The $25-million investment, together with a substantial internal generation of cash from increased earnings, will soon be available for the renovation of existing supermarkets and the addition of new opportunities,” Moxon said. The performance of the two existing Pick n Pay stores also contributed to the chain’s positive bottom line, and helped enable the refurbishment. “These programmes will be accelerated substantially in 2013.” Pick n Pay currently operates 95 stores in Africa, the latest of which was opened in Luanshya in Zambia on 22 March. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Indian stumper Deep Dasgupta claims Wicketkeeper of the Week honours

Indian stumper Deep Dasgupta claims Wicketkeeper of the Week honours

first_imgIndia’s rookie stumper Deep Dasgupta’s gutsy showing as opener in the second Test against South Africa at Port Elizabeth helped him claim the Wicketkeeper of the Week honours ahead of Kumara Sangakkara, Adam Gilchrist and Andy Flower in the ESPN-Star Sports Super Selector competition for the week ending November 26.Gavaskar,India’s rookie stumper Deep Dasgupta’s gutsy showing as opener in the second Test against South Africa at Port Elizabeth helped him claim the Wicketkeeper of the Week honours ahead of Kumara Sangakkara, Adam Gilchrist and Andy Flower in the ESPN-Star Sports Super Selector competition for the week ending November 26.Gavaskar takes overClick here to EnlargeAustralia’s Ricky Ponting left behind a slow start to his home season with a century against New Zealand in the rain-hit Hobart Test. His 157 runs saw him become the Batsman of the Week ahead of Craig Wishart, Dion Ebrahim and Justin Langer.At Kandy, Sri Lankan off-spinner Muttiah Muralitharan picked up his second successive 10-wicket haul in Tests to emerge the Bowler of the Week.South African Jacques Kallis’ patient century and two wickets in India’s first innings in the unofficial Test at Centurion fetched him 165 points and the Allrounder of the Week title.Meanwhile, Muralitharan also rewarded his backers in the Super Selector competition with a rich haul of 558 points, thanks mainly to the 21 wickets in the two Tests against the West Indies.last_img read more