Month: January 2021

Zimmer named 2010-2011 varsity Leprechaun

Zimmer named 2010-2011 varsity Leprechaun

first_img“I tried out last year and got the Blue Squad [leprechaun position] … and came back this year with more experience and knowledge and was able to get the Gold Squad position,” he said. “It’s something I’ve always wanted ever since I came here,” Zimmer said. “I knew that I fit the bill. I’ve never been shy in front of crowds.” Fifteen men originally came out for tryouts, and five remained for the final round of tryouts.  Zimmer said he has been vying for the position since last year’s tryouts.  Zimmer, who transferred from Purdue, wrestled his freshman year and came to tryouts his sophomore year as a cheerleading novice. Zimmer said his experience on the Blue Squad helped him secure the Gold Squad position, but it did have its difficulties. “I had a lot of chances to talk to Dan and ask him questions,” Zimmer said. “He really did serve as a very good mentor. He was a wonderful leprechaun.” “Being in the tunnel [before the Blue-Gold game] was such an amazing experience,” Zimmer said. “I think the thing I’m looking forward to most is running onto the field and carrying that flag at our home opener against Purdue.” As Blue Squad leprechaun, Zimmer led cheers at the men’s and women’s soccer, hockey, volleyball and women’s basketball games.   “It was a very big learning experience.” Collins said Zimmer is the right kind of leprechaun the program is looking for. Brian Kelly won’t be the only new face on the Notre Dame Stadium sidelines this fall.  “Dave really brought an intense level of energy to his tryout and that’s one of the most essential things that any leprechaun candidate needs,” Collins said. “I think in addition to his energy, he also has that fighting Irish swagger that the leprechaun needs to have.” While practicing for the tryouts, Zimmer said he and former leprechaun Dan Collins became friends.  “They like to see how you can handle yourself in a game time situation,” Zimmer said.“Being a Blue Squad leprechaun was sometimes difficult because often there wasn’t the same crowd capacity that men’s football or basketball had. But toward the end of the season, women’s basketball was very good and had the chance to travel with them to Connecticut and Kansas City. Zimmer was named the new leprechaun two weeks ago after an intense tryout that included cheerleading stunts, a three-minute pep rally, a television interview adapted to a game time situation, a jig-off and a pushup contest. David Zimmer, a junior from Angola, Ind. and a resident of O’Neill Hall, was named the new leprechaun for the 2010-2011 school year, kicking off his new role at The Shirt unveiling Friday at the Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore.  “He grew up a lifelong ND fan so he has a sense of the tradition he’s now a part of,” Collins said. “He really understands the spirit he’s called to embody. He’s going to do a great job.” Collins also said Zimmer’s longtime enthusiasm for Notre Dame will benefit his work as the new leprechaun.  Zimmer said he looks forward especially to next year’s football opener.  “I actually had never had any cheerleading experience before,” Zimmer said. last_img read more

Saint Mary’s students market new soda for business course

Saint Mary’s students market new soda for business course

first_imgMany students dream of starting their own businesses in the future, but for five Saint Mary’s students, that dream is becoming a reality. Juniors Lindsey Downs, Hannah Hupp, Loren Sampson and Hanna Vicary and senior Jeanne Michael developed Twist O’Luck soda as part of a course called New Venture. Hupp described the drink as a lemon lime soda with a grapefruit flavor. The class is new to Saint Mary’s this year and is meant to inspire student entrepreneurship, business professor Susan Vance said. Vance, who is leading this semester’s groups, said it isn’t a normal class. “This is a great non-traditional class,” Vance said. “In the fall semester, three teams of students developed a business concept, did a feasibility study, wrote a business plan and pitched their idea to a loan committee consisting of business faculty and professional bankers.” Vicary said the class was challenging. “Entering the New Venture class I did not realize the complexities of launching a small business, as well as the amount of time and energy involved in the process,” she said. “The entire first semester we worked on the logistics including coming up with our idea, writing a business plan, pitching our idea to the Saint Mary’s business department and local bankers, and going through the loan process. We then ordered the soda, submitted the labels for print and put it on the shelves. We are excited to be in the implementation stage.” Vance said she and assistant business professor Bob Williams, along with an alumna mentor, lead each team. The other teams involved in New Venture will be debuting their products later in the semester. “[Twist O’Luck] is the first student company in SMC history to launch from the newly created entrepreneurship initiative,” Vance said. The group said they enjoyed launching and creating the project. “Developing our own product was a lot of fun. We had an image in mind and Northwoods Soda helped us produce it,” Michael said. “We knew we wanted a green, refreshing soda and we wanted the novelty of having a glass bottle. One of our greatest challenges was designing the label. We wanted the design to reflect the name Twist O’ Luck and create curiosity about the product.” A small distributor produces the soda. “[Twist O’Luck] is produced by a small craft soda producer, is definitely not mass-produced and the quality shows,” she said. The students launched the drink at Saint Mary’s Noble Family Dining Hall with great success, Vance said. “The product has been doing great,” Sampson said. “There has been a lot of shown interest in our soda. We have sparked curiosity throughout our customers. We cannot wait to see how the product sells through the remainder of the year.” The College now sells the soda in the Student Center for $1.69 per bottle. “Seeing what a success the promotional event was, we are excited to see how far Twist O’ Luck can go,” Downs said. “We plan on going to smaller local businesses to market Twist O’ Luck, making it more available to the public. Therefore, let’s see how far our Luck can take us.”last_img read more

Howard wins Hall of the Year

Howard wins Hall of the Year

first_imgWhile students fiercely contest which residence hall is the best dorm on campus, only residents of Howard Hall can truthfully make that claim this year. Hall Presidents’ Council named Howard the 2012 overall Hall of the Year on Tuesday night. Carroll Hall was awarded men’s Hall of the Year, and Ryan Hall earned women’s Hall of the Year honors. Seniors Jay Mathes and Billy Wardlaw, executive co-chairs of Hall Presidents’ Council, said they modified the Hall of the Year selection process this year to “make it a more democratic voting process,” Mathes said. Wardlaw said each hall gave a presentation to Hall Presidents’ Council, and the winners were chosen based on a point system. Howard Hall was recognized as the best dorm on campus for its development of a family atmosphere this year, Wardlaw said. “This year, they had a new hall staff and hall government, and they really tried to create a family environment in Howard, to make it feel open and welcome,” he said. Sophomore and Howard co-president Clare Robinson said she felt she reached her goal of “making Howard a better place to live.” “[Howard co-president] Shelby Hood and I ran on the platform of bringing a little Disney magic to Howard,” Robinson said. “We started with a completely new hall staff, so when we started this year, we really did start fresh.” Mathes said Howard’s collaboration with other halls, clubs and groups on campus also factored into their win. “It was the overall collaboration and accomplishment with other groups and clubs,” he said. “Their work was consistent and exceptional this year.” Carroll Hall was named men’s Hall of the Year for its dorm unity and spirit, junior and former Carroll president Andrew Owens said. (Editor’s Note: Owens is an assistant managing editor at The Observer.) “Carroll Hall won men’s Hall of the Year with an extreme amount of unity and spirit that is unparalleled anywhere else on campus,” he said. “It is great to see the rest of campus realize what we’ve known for awhile.” Wardlaw said one contribution to Carroll’s win was the number of students the hall retained from last year. “Carroll had one of its highest retention rates this year,” he said. “Lots of people leave due to the location, but they have really been able to foster the community.” Ryan Hall earned women’s Hall of the Year honors for its commitment to its goal of upholding the mission of the Congregation of Holy Cross, “making God loved, known and served” throughout the year, Mathes said. Wardlaw said the Ryan community also upheld the mantra “Ryan Go Bragh,” or “Ryan Forever,” in all its activities and initiatives. Junior and Ryan Hall president Chrissie Diebold said the hall community wanted to demonstrate their investment in the campus community by hosting some campus-wide events and collaborating with other dorms. “We’ve done a great job this year and really come together as a dorm,” she said. “We hosted the September 11th Room of Remembrance in [LaFortune Student Center] with other dorms the weekend of 9/11,” she said. “And we collaborated with Pangborn to host an event for non-juniors on Junior Parents Weekend. We had an inflatable obstacle course and mechanical bull.”last_img read more

Professor speaks on miracles in “Last Lecture” series

Professor speaks on miracles in “Last Lecture” series

first_imgNotre Dame, and Fisher Hall in particular, would not be the same without political science professor, Kellogg Institute fellow, Alliance for Catholic Education (ACE) co-founder and Fisher resident Fr. Tim Scully. Scully spoke Tuesday night in the Coleman-Morse Center lounge as part of the “Last Lecture” series. He began his lecture by asking the audience whether or not they believe in miracles. “Do you believe in miracles?” Scully said. “I think miracles happen all the time. The very fabric of life is made up of miracles.” The lecture was divided into three lessons he learned through important experiences in his life. He explained the division was based on his belief that all good things come in threes. “I’m an intense and unapologetic Trinitarian. I believe not just God, but all good things come in threes,” he said. The first lesson came as a result of his work with local prisoners while a sophomore at Notre Dame. Scully explained after hearing the stories of poverty and broken families from these prisoners, he reevaluated his own upbringing in suburban Illinois. He said the lesson he took away was that life is a gift – and it is meant to be given away in service to others. “Life is little else than gift after gift after gift,” Scully said. “Life is a gift to be given away,” The death of Scully’s father taught him a second important lesson. He said his father’s death made the fact he would also die more real; this led him to evaluate how he was living his life. “If it’s true that I will die, how do I want to live?” Scully said. The University of Chicago Law School and a legal career were Scully’s dream, he said. This did not change until his senior year at Notre Dame and after he had been accepted to his dream school. Scully said he realized he was looking in the wrong place one night during his senior year when he felt compelled to attend daily Mass at Morrissey Hall. It was after this experience that he realized his heart’s deepest desire and God’s will were directing him toward the priesthood. He said the miracle of receiving the Eucharist daily inspired this change of direction, even though he had not been one to attend daily Mass prior to his experience that night. “If I’m going to Mass every day, I might as well become a priest,” Scully said. “For me, since then, the Eucharist has become a beautiful sustaining miracle in my life.” Scully said the second lesson he came away with was to pursue the life he desired in his heart without compromising and without fearing failure. He said there is always an opportunity to learn from failure. “Don’t be afraid to take risks and fail, because failure is the stuff of wisdom,” Scully said. After his theological studies, Scully was sent to Santiago, Chile with the Congregation of Holy Cross. He said when working in Chile he came across a saying capturing his second lesson of learning from mistakes and recognizing one’s mortality. “In Chile there’s a wonderful saying, ‘We all die at least twice in life. Pray that your first death comes early enough that you can learn from it,’” Scully said. Scully’s third and final lesson was that relationships are of the utmost importance in life. “Nothing else matters but the quality of your relationships with God, with each other and with yourselves,” Scully said. Scully learned this lesson through living in Fisher Hall, where he connected with Fr. Richard Warner, superior general of the Congregation of Holy Cross, and through teaching at the University. “I’ve fallen in love with teaching,” Scully said. “How could you not fall in love with being a teacher?” Contact Christian Myers at [email protected]last_img read more

SMC alumna delivers ‘Life After Music Degree’ lecture

SMC alumna delivers ‘Life After Music Degree’ lecture

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Department of Music hosted the final lecture in the “Life After a Music Degree” series Monday, bringing a College alumna in to speak on “How the Path Might Redirect Over Time.” Patricia Doyle, director of corporate and foundation relations for the College, said she has always been passionate about music and her career path began long before her time as a music major at Saint Mary’s. “My involvement in music started when I was eight years old,” Doyle said. “A piano was delivered to our house, and my mother told me I would begin lessons tomorrow.” Doyle said she studied piano all through high school and entered the convent at Saint Mary’s after her high school graduation, where she declared a major in music. During her time at the College, Doyle said she was interested in music theory, history, and form analysis. “I like to see how things fit together, whether it be crossword puzzles or scheduling,” Doyle said.   Doyle said she graduated with a degree in music but left the convent between her junior and senior year. During her senior year, she volunteered at a Children’s Hospital in South Bend, designing music programs for developmentally disabled children. Doyle took two classes about Special Eeducation that year, which she said made her career in music start to veer in that direction. “I found out about a field called music therapy,” Doyle said. At the time, Doyle said, there were only five programs in the United States that offered music therapy programs. She attended the University of Kansas, where she received a second Bachelor’s degree in Music Therapy. “I went in there Gungh, to make a career for children. That was my goal in life,” Doyle said. “At age 24, I felt I knew what I wanted to do in life.” She then moved to Minnesota, where she worked at a large psychiatric hospital as supervisor of music therapy. Doyle said at the start, she has four music therapists working for her. This number increased to 14 by the time she left. “People saw I had the skills,” she said, “whether I did or not, I was going to try.” An opportunity came up for work in California but fell through shortly after Doyle moved there, she said. At that point, she said she knew “something will come up.” Doyle said she then encountered a school for struggling adolescents on a mountain in California, whict involved a two-year program that used music to create a better self-outlooksfor each child. She worked there for 19 years, running the school the last six years she was there. In 2003, Doyle moved back to South Bend, where she began a career of writing grants for various institutions. “My experience changed again, but what I kept going through always involved music,” Doyle said. “If you have a laptop and internet access, you can write a grant.” Doyle said she ran her own business of writing grants until 2012, when she spoke with a friend working in the developmental department of Saint Mary’s. A grant writing position then opened up at the College, and Doyle applied for and accepted a job offer. “Here I am today, writing grants for organizations, and we are doing very well,” Doyle said. “I had no idea I would end up back at Saint Mary’s.” Doyle said throughout her career, connections with other people were crucial to encountering new careers and opportunities. “If you can find someone you trust, they are a diamond, even if you don’t have a skill set,” she said. “The curious mind is also a diamond. It is a wonderful thing. If you have one, take it on.” Contact Rachel Rahal at [email protected]last_img read more

Senate discusses new first-year program

Senate discusses new first-year program

first_imgStudent Senate met Wednesday night to discuss upcoming projects for the school year, including the campaign “29 for 29.”Student body president Lauren Vidal said “29 for 29″ pairs the 29 Notre Dame dorms with 29 homes in the South Bend area for service during the holidays.All of the resident halls are included in this campus-wide service project. However, Senate discussed some of the concerns with the initiative.“One of the problems is that students go home around the holidays, which is when the program would be taking place,” Vidal said.Nonetheless, the initial lines of communication have been set with the Center for the Homeless, and the program is expected to start around Thanksgiving.The group also discussed recent changes with the first-year program, in which Notre Dame has decided to abolish the physical education program.Student body vice president Matt Devine discussed the structure of the new program.“A committee of professors was formed to discuss unexplored opportunities for the program,” Devine said.It was decided that a program including student socialization, cultural competency, extra and co-curricular activities and pedagogy would better serve the first-year students. Yet some members of Senate expressed discontent with the changes.“P.E. was empowering people to play sports like squash that they wouldn’t normally play, and this was a great way to help people from different sets of backgrounds to come together and learn a new set of skills,” said representative for Alumni Hall Scott Moore.The group is meeting with Dean Hugh Page next Wednesday to discuss their questions and concerns.“I would encourage you … to harness any feelings that you may have about this so that we can have a discussion while respecting the decision that has been made,” Vidal said.Tags: 29 for 29, Senatelast_img read more

SMCDM FT5K to commemorate life of former Riley patient

SMCDM FT5K to commemorate life of former Riley patient

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s College Dance Marathon (SMCDM) will host its annual FT5k Saturday at 9 a.m. This year’s event is dedicated to Charlotte Terry, a girl who lost her battle with cancer this past summer. “SMCDM raises money and awareness for the children at Riley Hospital for Children, through year-round events, fundraisers and personal giving efforts that all culminate into our big, 12-hour marathon event in the spring,” co-president of SMCDM Maranda Pennington said. “Our hopes for the FT5K event is to raise awareness for Riley kids in our community and have more people realize why what we do is so important.”Although the event takes place annually, this year marks the first time the event is dedicated to a child at Riley Hospital. Allison Lukomski, Pennington’s co-president of SMCDM, said upon learning of Charlotte Terry’s story, she shared it with members of the SMCDM executive board.“She was this little angel that I introduced to the executive board, who soon after fell in love also,” she said. “Charlotte not even a year old was diagnosed with a brain tumor that had spread down her spinal cord. The way in which the family spoke and kept a positive attitude throughout her entire battle is what truly inspired me.”Although neither Lukomski nor Pennington met Charlotte, they said she greatly impacted their own lives personally. “Charlotte provided me with a new outlook and perspective on life, making sure each moment is cherished,” Lukomski said. “Although I never had the chance to meet Charlotte, she will be a part of my eternity. And I hope that the Saint Mary’s community can soon feel the same.“If anything, the Dance Marathon board would like to have all community members who are willing to come and share this morning with us as we share a story of love and inspiration of our little superhero, Charlotte Terry.”In honor of Charlotte, co-fundraising chair member of SMCDM Katherine Slisz said, “Our tanks all will say, ‘Charlotte strong,’ on the back to remind us why we raise money for Riley Hospital for Children.”“I also think a huge goal of every event is to show the Riley kids and families that we are there to support and love them. At the end of the day, every single thing we do if FTK — for the kids,” Pennington said. Mary Claire Burchett, a co-fundraising chair member, said the members of SMCDM “hope the school and community will come out and have a fun day walking [and] running as we strive to help raise money and awareness for such an unbelievable cause and help the kids at Riley.”For more information, visit the SMCDM webpage at smcdm.org.Tags: 5K, Dance Marathon, saint mary’s, SMCDMlast_img read more

‘The best thing to do is stop ‘other-ing’ people’

‘The best thing to do is stop ‘other-ing’ people’

first_imgEditor’s note: This article is the first in a series on disability at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. Today’s story examines the language surrounding disability.The 650 students registered with the Sara Bea Center for Students with Disabilities have the same abilities, interests, motivations and desires as the rest of the student body, Scott Howland, coordinator at Disability Services, said. “You might have certain barriers that need to be overcome to reach the same goals,” he said. “I think sometimes with disability we tend to talk about it more as kind of patronizing — that we see someone with a disability as someone who would be the recipient of our service, of our goodwill, type of thing. So more of an approach of, ‘We’re providing these services and accommodations more for equality, giving them equal access.’”Grace Agolia, a junior at Notre Dame who is deaf and uses a cochlear implant, said she thinks “disability” is “the best possible term we could use.”“It’s not pejorative, in my opinion. If you’re talking about words like ‘differently-abled,’ ‘special,’ ‘abnormality,’ ‘defective’ — those are pejorative terms,” she said. “I especially don’t like ‘differently-abled’ because it just avoids the fact that the person has a disability. Yes, people with disabilities have a differing perspective on life, and I think that’s something that people should enter into conversation about, ask them about, but that doesn’t mean they are ‘differently-abled.’”Agolia said she dislikes when people say “we all have disabilities.”“That’s just bad. Because it demeans the experience of people who have a physical disability,” she said. “I would agree that we all have things that set us back, but disability is a very specific type of setback, and I don’t think that’s something that can be applied to everyone. You have to respect the experiences of people with disabilities. I try to say ‘people with disabilities’ instead of ‘disabled persons’ because of the ontological connotations.”Agolia said she does not believe there should be a binary opposition between “disabled” and “non-disabled,” “deaf” and “not-deaf.” “Yes, we have those different experiences, but there doesn’t have to be a dichotomy — the experiences can be integrated, in order to have a fuller vision of what the world is, of what our existence is like,” she said. “It lends us new perspectives into the human experience.”Elizabeth Anthony, a senior at Notre Dame who has autoimmune conditions, said there is a sense of discomfort in discussing disabilities.“But I think that’s kind of a societal thing — disabilities make people uncomfortable, I think,” she said. “And I think it makes people with invisible disabilities really uncomfortable to identify themselves as disabled because number one, they feel like other people won’t understand, and number two, it can be a very defeating thing to yourself, to say, ‘I need these extra things.’“Especially because — I mean, in high school, I slept six hours a night and I ran cross country, and I did everything and I thought it was awesome. And then coming in my freshman year, I had to be significantly knocked down a few notches, usually by getting sick. So I’d be pushing myself too hard and I’d get sick and I’d be like, ‘OK, I need to step back.’“And it’s really hard to admit that to yourself when you’re used to living a certain way, so I think that’s part of it too. People may not want to admit that they need the help that they might have to offer.” Megan Crowley, a freshman at Notre Dame, has Pompe disease, which progressively weakens muscles.Editor’s note: Crowley spoke to The Observer with the assistance of her nurse, Debbie Larsen, who is quoted below. Crowley said she doesn’t see the word “disability” as a bad thing. “She knows she has a disability, she embraces the fact that she has a disability. She can, however, see that someone might find that offensive. But for her, she knows she has a disability. If someone uses it in a negative way to hurt you, then that would be a problem, but she doesn’t think it’s always offensive,” Larsen said. Jessica Ping, a freshman at Notre Dame who has CHILD syndrome, said she does not look at herself as disabled.“I get that that is the connotation that comes with being as I am, so I don’t mind the word, but I would never describe myself as that,” she said. “I would never put that in my top descriptors of myself as a person because I think it’s beyond the disability. I’m just an average teenaged girl trying to survive college.”Ross Kloeber, a first-year Notre Dame law student who is hard of hearing, said he does identify as disabled.“I am disabled, I have a disability. Maybe at some point, I was more reserved about it. I don’t necessarily feel like it’s a bad thing anymore,” he said.“The best thing to do is stop ‘other-ing’ people,” Kloeber said.“Sometimes with disability, when it is visible you can kind of pick something out and realize that they’re different than you — and that’s really not a distinction because everybody’s different than you,” he said.Bridget Dedelow, a senior at Saint Mary’s who has cerebral palsy, said the phrase “differently able” downplays the actual disability, and that there seem to be two sides of the spectrum: people who try to overcompensate with wording and people who are offensive.“I’ve had people call me a cripple, and that’s just rude,” she said. “There will always be a negative connotation — there isn’t a happy word for disabled. People with disabilities do live super happy lives, but it’s not always recognizable on the surface.”Dedelow said she has stopped trying to hide her disability. “I hid for a lot of years — sat up straighter [and] walked more smoothly, trying to overcompensate and that’s exhausting,” she said. “It wasn’t an epiphany moment, but I tried to hide out of fear of isolation and I was able to let that go. … It’s not about comparing myself, it’s about coming to that understanding.” People with disabilities are not “less valid,” but “less able in some ways,” Dedelow said. “I want ‘open-minded’ stamped on people’s foreheads, because if you don’t talk to people about it you won’t know,” she said. Fiona Van Antwerp, a sophomore at Saint Mary’s, said she has become comfortable talking about her dyslexia.“At times I wished I didn’t have dyslexia because it’s frustrating, but once I learned how to compensate for it, I’m alright,” she said. Accepting her disability hasn’t been easy, but Van Antwerp said her parents’ acceptance and love for her helped her to accept her dyslexia.“My mom when I was little tried to find out everything she could about how to help me,” she said. “If they can accept [my dyslexia], then I can accept it.”News Writers Megan Valley and Madison Jaros contributed to this story. Tags: disability, Disability series 2016, Observer Disability Series 2016, Office of Disability Services, Sara Bea Center for Students with Disabilitieslast_img read more

Rec Sports hosts class to promote gender inclusion

Rec Sports hosts class to promote gender inclusion

first_imgThis semester, RecSports moved to its brand-new location in the Duncan Student Center: the Smith Center for Recreational Sports. To ensure all students can take advantage of the center’s amenities, the Gender Relations Center is hosting Judgement Free Power Hour, a three-week weightlifting series geared towards helping gym newcomers grow more comfortable with exercise equipment, starting on April 8.Sophomore Maria Ventura, who works as a peer educator at the Gender Relations Center, said the course was created to combat gender norms pervasive in gym culture.“The dominance of weight-lifting areas by already strong and fit men is a common and near-universal phenomenon in gyms around the world,” she said in an email.Christine Caron Gebhardt, director of the Gender Relations Center, said these norms make certain individuals feel unwelcome in gym spaces, especially those who lack experience using weights.“I think when we all walk into new spaces, we look around to see how people are using the space,” she said. “So sometimes, you feel like, ‘Oh, if I don’t know what I’m doing, people are going to judge me.’”This stigma has negative implications for students’ overall wellbeing, she added.“The more [students] are able to engage in exercises or in health and wellness routines, the more they’re able to function at a higher performance,” she said. “I don’t want recreation to be limited.”Gebhardt said that RecSports’ relocation provided the perfect opportunity to rewrite these roles.“The way Smith is structured now, there’s more opportunity for people to mingle,” she said. “There’s a flow in the spaces that Duncan allows for that you couldn’t have in Rolf’s because of the way it was built.”With Judgement Free Power Hour, the Gender Relations Center seeks to use Smith’s unique layout as a means to claim gym space for all students, Ventura said.“Our goal was to prevent [gender noms] from taking root at the Smith Center by allowing those who have previously felt uncomfortable or unfamiliar in similar spaces to gain the experience and confidence to use these spaces and equipment in the new facility,” Ventura said.Chris O’Brien, a graduate intern with the Gender Relations Center, said that the course will feature hands-on training with gym equipment and will conclude with a group reflection about gender roles.“There’ll be a trainer there who’s instructing people on different weightlifting techniques, followed by a smoothie break afterwards with some discussion,” he said.The discussions will aim to create a dialogue about students’ personal encounters with gendered spaces, Gebhardt said.“We’re gonna start with people’s experiences,” she said.O’Brien said he wishes for students to view the course as an opportunity not only for self-improvement, but also as a chance to be a part of promoting inclusion at Notre Dame.“We hope students would gain the skills to be able to use the weights, but also that they would gain confidence in being able to use that space no matter who they are and what their identity is,” he said.Gebhardt said she hopes student discussion about the course will lead to similar improvements in gender inclusion in other areas of campus life.“My hope is that once students have [this] experience, that they’ll then be able to do that in other spaces,” she said.Tags: duncan student center, exercise, Gender Relations Center, gender roles, RecSportslast_img read more

Alumni residents, president discuss tradition and community

Alumni residents, president discuss tradition and community

first_imgEditor’s note: This article is one in a series profiling the dorms. Previous articles have covered dorms built before Alumni Hall.Alumni Hall was built in 1931 to house returning alumni on campus before being converted into a men’s dorm. Its Gothic architecture, fit with gargoyle-esque statues and elaborate stone carvings, hints at the deeply tradition-oriented dorm inside.An integral aspect of that tradition is Fr. George Rozum, Alumni’s time-honored rector, who is currently serving his 40th year as leader of Alumni’s pack of “Dawgs.” Rozum is Notre Dame’s longest-serving rector, which creates a uniquely interesting dynamic within the hall, said senior Matthew Bartilotti, Alumni resident, former hall president and current RA. Nicole Simon | The Observer Alumni Hall, a men’s dorm on South Quad, is home to the proud Dawgs.“Since [we] have a rector who’s been here for 40 years, there’s many generations of Notre Dame students who have been under Fr. George. Notre Dame already has such a high legacy rate, and in Alumni, there’s so many kids who had a brother, dad, or uncle who lived under Fr. George,” Bartilotti said. “So many guys come into the dorm already passionate about Alumni because of stories they’ve heard about Fr. George from their dad, their brother, their uncle. That’s something that’s unique.”Since 1978, Rozum has cultivated a strong community in Alumni Hall focused on fraternity, which is fitting with the dorm’s iconic Greek letters, Delta Omega Gamma.“I think to define the Alumni Hall community, I would say it’s a community predicated on everybody treating each other like brothers and like family and genuinely caring about each other, and that all stems from Fr. George,” Bartilotti said. “Fr. George addresses all his emails ‘Dear Blessed Men and Brothers of Alumni Hall,’ and he truly follows up on that and truly does care about each and every one of us like we were a son or a brother of his. So that really trickles down.”That sense of community allows for a strong dorm identity to form, full of longstanding traditions. In the fall, Alumni hosts its annual Rivalry Week with Dillon Hall that culminates in the Big Red Dawg Dance, the two dorms’ joint SYR.The dorm also celebrates an annual spirit week, referred to as Wake Week. The week’s events, according to Alumni’s website, “remain shrouded in mystery.”All the tradition and mystery doesn’t stop the Dawgs from some rather unconventional practices, however.“We have plenty of commissioners,” Bartilotti said. “We have a milk commissioner. We have an off-campus East Asian cuisine commissioner. On the application, you can select which spot you want or create your own. We have a bunch of really silly and fun things like that.”A new tradition in the works this year is called “Dawgtoberfest.” Junior Adam Hellinghausen, current hall president, is working on bringing this new potential signature event to life.“Some guys went abroad last year and said that Oktoberfest in Europe was the coolest thing they’d ever done,” Hellinghausen said. “They want to bring it back here. We could have charity events, like hot dog eating contest or something to raise money. And then beyond that, it’d be sort of just a festival to celebrate our dorm and our guys and just promote community and stuff like that.”The community is what Hellinghausen is most passionate about, he said.“What I’m looking forward to most, I’d say, about the presidency is not so much doing anything in particular, but more just getting to know the people of Alumni and really striving to listen to what they have to say, and just continuing the things that we’ve been doing,” he said. “We’re not just hanging out to have fun, we’re not just partying together, we’re not just studying together, we’re not just praying together. It’s all of those things in their time and place.”Tags: Alumni Hall, dorm, dorm featureslast_img read more