3 more die in U.P. floods

first_imgThree more flood-related deaths have been reported in Uttar Pradesh on Monday, taking the toll to 72. The overall situation in the State is still grim, the Relief Commissioner’s office said.Over 20 lakh people have been hit by the current spell of floods in 24 districts and 2,688 villages are under water.A report said 43,602 people had taken shelter in relief camps in eastern U.P., whipped by the raging waters of the rivers emanating from Nepal.Army choppers, NDRF and PAC jawans continued relief and rescue operations.A Central Water Commission report said the Sharda river was flowing above the red mark at Palia Kalan and near the danger mark at Shardanagar while the Ghaghra was flowing above the red mark at Elgin Bridge, Ayodhya and Turtipar (Ballia).In Bihar, light to moderate rainfall occurred at one or two places in the past 24 hours.With the south west monsoon getting weak, major cities of Patna, Gaya, Bhagalpur and Purnea did not receive any rainfall during the day.last_img read more

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Thane Police seize three tonnes of meat, say lab test confirms its beef

first_imgThe Thane district police seized a stock of three tonnes of animal meat from a tempo with police claiming that it was beef. Police said that the vehicle was intercepted in the early hours of Wednesday within the limits of Padgha police station and two persons, the driver and cleaner of the tempo, had been arrested. The Station House Officer of Padgha police station said that the lab test of the meat had confirmed that it was beef. The official said that the tempo was coming from Nashik to Mumbai and the meat was concealed beneath scrap items loaded onto the tempo. Police said that the tip-off about the tempo allegedly transporting beef was received from Bajrang Dal activists and a trap was laid at Ajroli checkpost to intercept the vehicle. The meat was being transported from Sangamner to Govandi in Mumbai where it was to be delivered to a meat-seller, police said. The official said that cases under relevant sections of the Maharashtra Animal Preservation (Amendment) Act of 1995 and also the Indian Penal Code had been registered against the two arrested persons.last_img read more

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International kite festival begins in Gujarat

first_imgThe international kite festival which attracts kite flyers from across the country and the world, began on Sunday in Ahmedabad. The international kite festival was inaugurated by Gujarat Chief Minister Vijay Rupani at Sabarmati Riverfront. The Governor O.P. Kohli was also present on the occasion. Kite enthusiasts from across India and also foreign countries are participating in the week-long festival that is being celebrated across cities in Gujarat. The state government-sponsored festival will culminate on January 14, which is celebrated as Uttarayan (Makar Sankranti). Around 150 delegates from 44 countries, including the UK, South Korea, New Zealand, China, Indonesia and Malaysia, have arrived here to participate in the event. Nearly 100 kite enthusiasts from 18 Indian states and hundreds of them from Ahmedabad also displayed their kite flying skills on the occasion. Chinese dragon kites and hundreds of kites tied to a single string hogged the limelight.“People from different countries have come here to fly kites. People from different states are also here. For around eight days, kite festivals will be celebrated in different cities in the state,” Rupani told reporters after opening the festival. He said the festival will give boost to the kite industry which employs around 3 lakh people. The state Congress, however, criticised the government over spending money in organising the kite festival. The Opposition party said the BJP government should instead provide relief to thousands of families associated with the kite industry by removing the 5% Goods and Services Tax (GST) imposed on the sector.last_img read more

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‘Impact of mining closure not as bad as in 2012’

first_imgGoa Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar reiterated on Wednesday that the State’s economy will not be impacted much from the February 7 Supreme Court order to cancel mining leases. The views of all stakeholders are being heard before deciding on the future course of action. Addressing a press conference after meeting a cross-section of legislators and listening to their views on the emerging mining situation and it’s impact on the cancellation of 88 iron ore extraction leases, Mr. Parrikar said a final decision over resumption of mining and mode of leasing will be taken in 15 to 20 days. “Without going into the merits of the judgement, one has to accept it because Goa is facing economic problems. Now all stakeholders, including the judiciary will have to take into consideration the economic trajectory. It is not possible for government to suddenly disrupt it,” Mr. Parrikar said. However, he said the economic impact would not be as bad as in 2012, when iron ore exports were at their peak. “Direct revenue last year (from mining sector) will not exceed ₹300 crore, indirect (revenue) may account for another ₹50 to ₹100 crore. So, ₹300 crore in a total net budgetary size of ₹10,000 crore makes for 3% to 4 %,” he said.last_img read more

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Rahul Gandhi does a ‘balancing act’ in M.P., makes Kamal Nath Congress State unit chief

first_imgIn a move that is being viewed as a ‘balancing act’ between different factions, Congress president Rahul Gandhi on Thursday appointed Kamal Nath as the Madhya Pradesh Congress unit president and Jyotiraditya Scindia as the chief of the campaign committee in the State that is headed for polls later this year.Former Chief Minister Digvijaya Singh, who has just returned to politics after a six-month long sabbatical to complete 3,100 km of Narmada parikrama (circumbulation) yatra, hasn’t been given any responsibility yet.While the Congress wants to project a united face of the party in the State with Kamal Nath at the helm, it is seeking to put up a strong campaign against three-term BJP Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan with Mr. Scindia as the head of the campaign committee.last_img read more

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2013 helicopter crash: pilot ignored poor visibility, says report

first_imgMumbai: An investigation by the Aircraft Accident Investigation Board into the September 2013 helicopter crash in Tukawade, Thane, which killed all five on board, has revealed the accident was caused due to the pilot continuing the flight in very poor visibility conditions with insufficient ground clearance and hitting a hill due to spatial disorientation.The report, prepared in 2014 but made public only earlier this week, also mentions that non-functioning of the weather radar and non-familiarity of the pilot with the terrain along with lack of valid training on the specific type of helicopter, contributed to the accident.A three-member committee headed by R S Passi as chairman, Captain V M Satish Koikal and K Chandra Shekhar as members, investigated the crash. The helicopter, belonging to United Helicharters, was flying from Juhu to Aurangabad when it crashed on September 29, 2013. The deceased included Captain Surendra Bhadoria, co-pilot Alan Martin, additional pilot Anshu Matha, engineer Yatin Wakade and technician Dean D’Souza.The report said that from the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) transcript, it was clear the crew experienced poor visibility right from the beginning. “The pilot was not familiar with the terrain. The radar was unserviceable. The flight was continued in poor visibility and without adequate terrain clearance. The pilot tried to maintain ground contact, resulting in not having safe ground clearance,” the report read.The report also mentions the early take-off of the helicopter from Juhu had been necessitated by refusal of Aurangabad air traffic controllers to extend watch hours (duty timings) in the morning, thereby indirectly contributing to the accident. The committee also said it appeared that the pilot was under mental compulsion to complete the flight as there was not much flying by the company in the recent past and fulfilling the flying contract from Nagpur for 30 days was important from the commercial point of view.“No action was taken by the crew as per the existing instructions or procedures. The crew did not review the situation, nor did they abandon further flight due to the weather situation. As seen from the CVR readout they were encountering clouds almost from the beginning, the crew displayed undue eagerness to press ahead with the flight as per the flight plan in VFR despite poor visibility. At a distance of 85 kms from Mumbai, the pilot decided to fly on instruments,” the report revealed.last_img read more

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Man lynched in Bihar for killing wife

first_imgA 48-year-old man was lynched by villagers in Bihar’s Rohtas district on Saturday after he bludgeoned his wife to death with an iron rod. The incident occurred at Vishrampur village under Mufassil police station of the district. Mufassil police station SHO Jagniwas Singh said the deceased have been identified as Durgawati Devi,40, and her husband Gopal Nutt.Police are investigating the double murder and ascertaining what led to the fight between the couple. Nutt allegedly hit his wife on the head, inflicting fatal injuries to her.Devi, who was brought to Sadar hospital by villagers, succumbed to her injuries. This angered the villagers who, in turn, beat up her husband and killed him on the spot, the SHO said. The post-mortem of both the bodies have been conducted, the SHO said and added that an unnamed FIR has been lodged with Mufassil police station.last_img read more

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Panel to probe ‘errors’ in BU results

first_imgThe Higher Education Department in Odisha has decided that a special committee would probe the allegations regarding errors and irregularities in the results of second semester examination of Plus III degree courses of Berhampur University even as the students continue their agitation over the issue.On Thursday, students from five colleges of Berhampur and its outskirts demonstrated in front of the administrative block of Berhampur University demanding immediate rectification of their results.Meeting with officialsSpeaking to media persons, Vice-Chancellor Rajendra Prasad Das said a delegation of the university had been called to Bhubaneswar by the State Higher Education Minister for discussion in the matter. The delegation included the V-C, Registrar, PG Council Chairman and Controller of Examinations. Berhampur MLA Ramesh Chandra Chyau Patnaik, Gopalpur MLA Pradeep Panigrahy and senior officials of the department attended the meeting.Four-member panel After reviewing the allegations brought up by the students, the Higher Education Department decided to get the issue probed by a special four-member committee, said the V-C.The committee will visit Berhampur University on August 4 for an on-the-spot enquiry. The committee will file its report to the Ministry by August 10. Based on the report, the department will direct the university authorities regarding future action related to the matter.last_img read more

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Portuguese man-of-war spotted on Goa beach

first_imgThe Drishti Marine, Goa Tourism’s beach safety agency has issued an advisory for tourists as well as residents to refrain from venturing into the sea on Baga beach, as lifeguards have spotted a cluster of Portuguese man-of-war, a jelly-like marine organism, washed ashore on the popular beach in north Goa.The marine organism is commonly known as ‘bluebottle’ or ‘floating terror’.The bluebottle spotted on Friday were less than an inch in size, said Drishti Marine in its communiction to the State Tourism department.Drishti Marine has cautioned that the bluebottle could possibly be present in the waters or along the shoreline. Even wading into the waters is not advisable during the monsoon as the sea and weather conditions are not favourable for swimming. While most jellyfish stings are harmless to humans and cause only a mild irritation, species like the bluebottle are venomous and can cause harm on contact. Even a dead bluebottle washed up on shore can deliver a sting, said the advisory to tourists.First aidFirst aid that can be delivered include washing the stung area with hot water, as heat breaks down the toxins. Vinegar is also known to diffuse the poison present in the tentacles. Ice packs can reduce swelling but a visit to the doctor is recommended, the advisory added.last_img read more

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1984 anti-Sikh riots: Amarinder Singh backs Rahul Gandhi’s view

first_imgA day after the Shiromani Akali Dal hit out at Congress president Rahul Gandhi for his remarks on the 1984 anti-Sikh riots, Punjab Chief Minister Captain Amarinder Singh on Sunday said the Congress, as a party, had not been involved in the carnage.He said if any individual was involved, he or she would be dealt with under the law. “To blame the entire party for the acts of a few was preposterous and typical of the political immaturity of Sukhbir Singh Badal [SAD leader],” he said.Badal’s chargeMr. Badal had alleged that Mr. Gandhi was trying to protect those Congress leaders who were involved in the riots.Capt. Singh said Mr. Gandhi’s latest comments need to be seen in context with his earlier statements on the 1984 riots naming some Congress members.“By attacking Mr. Gandhi, and saying that he knew about the role of many individual Congress leaders in the riots, Sukhbir has only exposed his fear of the Congress president’s growing popularity,” the Chief Minister said.He said Mr. Gandhi had condemned all violence, including the 1984 riots, and had called for strict punishment to its perpetrators.“It is unfortunate that due to delays caused by the judicial system, justice had been denied to many victims of the 1984 riots,” he said.last_img read more

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Boy rescued from 200-ft borewell after 16-hour operation near Pune

first_imgA six-year-old boy trapped in a 200-ft deep borewell in Pune district was rescued on Thursday after a 16-hour-long operation involving police and disaster response personnel.A crowd looked on as National Disaster Response Force and police officials carried six-year-old Ravi Pandit Bhil, who was stuck at a depth of 10 feet. Ravi, son of a road construction worker, fell into the borewell on Wednesday afternoon while playing near Thorandale village, 70 km from Pune. The NDRF team said the boy was rescued at around 9 am and is in good health. “The operation was very critical and required meticulous planning to avoid any injury to the child,” an NDRF official said.“The NDRF was successful in saving the child. Our team members worked painstakingly, never losing sight of the task.last_img read more

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Three killed on suspicion of witchcraft

first_imgThree persons — a couple and 77-year-old woman — were allegedly killed on suspicion of witchcraft in the Gunupur police station area of Odisha’s Rayagada district.All the three — Gopal Sabar, his wife Laxmi Sabar and Jakili Sabar — residents of Ukumbaguda village, had been missing since February 23. The couple’s daughter, Sabita Sabar, had filed an FIR with the police saying that her parents and the aged woman were murdered by some villagers who accused them to be practitioners of witchcraft.On receiving the information, a police team led by Gunupur Sub-Divisional Police Officer Rajkishor Dash reached the spot along with a scientific team and a sniffer dog. The police have detained four persons in connection with the incident.Mr Dash said initial probe hints that the three were beaten to death and their bodies burnt on February 23 night. Their charred remains were thrown in a pond.last_img read more

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ScienceShot: World’s Oldest Wine Cellar?

first_imgArchaeologists excavating a 3700-year-old Canaanite palace in northern Israel have unearthed what they say is the largest, oldest wine cellar in the Near East. The 5-by-8-meter basement storeroom held 40 large jars (examples in image), each of which could have held about 50 liters of liquid. By taking shards of pottery and boiling them in a chemical solvent, researchers extracted organic compounds from the residues left behind when the wine evaporated. Those substances included traces of tartaric acid and syringic acid—telltale substances found in wine—as well as hints of other ingredients such as honey, mint, cinnamon bark, juniper berries, and various plant resins, the team reports today in Baltimore at the annual meeting of the American Schools of Oriental Research. Some of these ingredients added flavor, some were used as preservatives, and yet others were presumably added for their mind-altering characteristics, the researchers say. Moreover, while some of these ingredients were locally produced, others were imported. The consistency of the proportions of compounds from one jar to the next suggests that the wines—some were red, and some white—were “consciously crafted and brewed” according to a sophisticated recipe, one team member said. The volume of jars discovered thus far suggests that all the wine was destined to be consumed there in the palace. However, archaeologists have discovered two other doors leading from the basement storeroom to adjacent rooms that haven’t yet been excavated. If those rooms also contain wine jars, the researchers say, that might suggest that the palace was also a distribution point for locally produced wine. While older examples of wine have been found elsewhere—including a substantial stockpile found in an Egyptian tomb—the newly described, actively used wine cellar is certainly the oldest found thus far in this region.See more ScienceShots. *Update, 22 November, 1:08 p.m.: This story has been updated to clarify that evidence of older wines has been found, but the newly described stockpile was the largest, actively used wine cellar in the Near East.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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European Parliament Approves Horizon 2020 Funding Plan

first_imgThe European Parliament has formally approved Horizon 2020, the European Union’s funding program for research and innovation for 2014 through 2020.This leaves one formal step to go before the program’s actual rollout. Publication of the first calls for proposals is scheduled for 11 December, pending formal agreement from E.U. member states, the European Commission said in a statement released after the vote.In a vote taking place in Strasbourg, France, today, a wide majority of the plenary approved the program’s details, laid out in five draft regulations. The vote confirms a preliminary deal brokered earlier this year between negotiators of the European Parliament and the Council of Ministers.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)“This is a vote of confidence in the power of EU research and innovation funding,” research commissioner Máire Geoghegan-Quinn said in the statement. “The European Parliament’s support for and input to Horizon 2020 has been very important.”In 2011, the commission proposed Horizon 2020 as a departure from the past, with less red tape, a stronger focus on innovation and “close-to-market” research efforts, and a beefed-up budget for the European Research Council’s basic science grants.The Parliament supported Horizon 2020’s approach and tried to increase its budget to €100 billion, up from the Commission’s €80 billion proposal. But it faced resistance from money-conscious member states, which instead downsized the budget to about €70 billion. That is about €15 billion more than the €55 billion provided under the current Seventh Framework Programme, which started in 2007 and ends this year. (The figures correspond to 2011 euros.)Ministers from E.U. nations are expected to reach a similar agreement on Horizon 2020 in coming weeks, finalizing the plan.last_img read more

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Video: Robotic Crabs Reveal Sexual Frustration in Crustaceans

first_imgWith his huge, showy, yellow claw, the male Mjöberg’s fiddler crab (Uca mjoebergi) is an eye-catching crustacean that lives on the marine mud flats of northern Australia. Like many other fiddlers, he uses his claw to attract a mate, the much smaller and more demure female. Researchers have been studying how female fiddlers choose between their many suitors. They’ve learned, for instance, that males with larger claws, especially those that wave them faster, have an edge in dating. To amp up their science, however, they’ve added a robotic twist—building “RoboCrabs” that can wave an array of claws in a variety of ways. The automated fiddlers have helped the scientists uncover other factors that influence mate choice. In a study published this month in Behavioral Ecology, for example, they found that females showed a strong aversion to otherwise irresistible males if the guys were waving from the tops of small mounds. That might be because elevated mating sites are too dry or exposed to predators. But the researchers admit they aren’t sure why females scorned the elevated crabs—which they dubbed the “fiddlers on the roof.”(Video credit: Science/AAAS)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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ScienceShot: Protecting Ships From Undersea Eruptions

first_imgPlumes of volcanic ash are a well-known threat to aircraft. A similar threat occurs beneath the ocean surface: Undersea volcanoes belch out pumice that floats to the surface and then clumps together into large, sometimes more-than-a-meter-thick rafts of frothy rock. This material can clog the engines and intake valves on ships and can even drift long distances to block harbors. Now, simulations of pumice dispersal from a submarine eruption in the southwest Pacific in 2012 offer hope of advance warning of these perils. The eruption, which took place mostly over the course of a single day, emanated from the Havre undersea volcano (which lies about 800 kilometers northeast of New Zealand and whose peak is more than 700 meters below sea level). Rafts of pumice quickly covered 400 square kilometers of sea (image shown was taken 28 July 2012, about 8 days after the eruption) but later broke apart into streamers hundreds of kilometers long. When researchers fed data about ocean currents and typical winds in the region at that time of year into a program that simulates how ocean eddies tend to disperse floating objects, they successfully tracked the pumice as it spread to afflict an area twice the size of New Zealand. In the future, similar simulations could track pumice patches in near-real time, providing navigators with a weather forecast–like early warning system, the team reports online today in Nature Communications.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Five things scientists could learn with their new, improved particle accelerator

first_imgSAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA—The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is back, and it’s better than ever. The particle accelerator, located at CERN, the European particle physics lab near Geneva, Switzerland, shut down in February 2013, and since then scientists have been upgrading and repairing it and its particle detectors. The LHC will be back up to full speed this May. Yesterday, scientists discussed the new prospects for the LHC at the annual meeting of AAAS (which publishes Science).The LHC is the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. Protons blast along its 17-mile (27-kilometer) ring at nearly light speed, colliding at the sites of several particle detectors, which sift through the resulting particle debris. In 2012, LHC’s ATLAS and CMS experiments discovered the Higgs boson with data from the LHC’s first run, thereby explaining how particles get mass. The revamped LHC will run at a 60% higher energy, with more sensitive detectors, and a higher collision rate. What might we find with the new-and-improved machine? Here are five questions scientists hope to answer:1. Does the Higgs boson hold any surprises?Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Now that we’ve found the Higgs boson, there’s still a lot we can learn from it. Thanks to the LHC’s energy boost, it will produce Higgs bosons at a rate five times higher, and scientists will be using the resulting abundance of Higgs to understand the particle in detail. How does it decay? Does it match the theoretical predictions? Anything out of the ordinary would be a boon to physicists, who are looking for evidence of new phenomena that can explain some of the unsolved mysteries of physics.2. What is “dark matter”?Only 15% of the matter in the universe is the kind we are familiar with. The rest is dark matter, which is invisible to us except for subtle hints, like its gravitational effects on the cosmos. Physicists are clamoring to know what it is. One likely dark matter culprit is a WIMP, or weakly interacting massive particle, which could show up in the LHC. Dark matter’s fingerprints could even be found on the Higgs boson, which may sometimes decay to dark matter. You can bet that scientists will be sifting through their data for any trace.3. Will we ever find supersymmetry?Supersymmetry, or SUSY, is a hugely popular theory of particle physics that would solve many unanswered questions about physics, including why the mass of the Higgs boson is lighter than naively expected—if only it were true. This theory proposes a slew of exotic elementary particles that are heavier twins of known ones, but with different spin—a type of intrinsic rotational momentum. Higher energies at the new LHC could boost the production of hypothetical supersymmetric particles called gluinos by a factor of 60, increasing the odds of finding it.4. Where did all the antimatter go?Physicists don’t know why we exist. According to theory, after the big bang the universe was equal parts matter and antimatter, which annihilate one another when they meet. This should have eventually resulted in a lifeless universe devoid of matter. But instead, our universe is full of matter, and antimatter is rare—somehow, the balance between matter and antimatter tipped. With the upgraded LHC, experiments will be able to precisely test how matter might differ from antimatter, and how our universe came to be.5. What was our infant universe like?Just after the big bang, our universe was so hot and dense that protons and neutrons couldn’t form, and the particles that make them up—quarks and gluons—floated in a soup known as the quark-gluon plasma. To study this type of matter, the LHC produces extra-violent collisions using lead nuclei instead of protons, recreating the fireball of the primordial universe. Aided by the new LHC’s higher rate of collisions, scientists will be able to take more baby photos of our universe than ever before.Check out our full coverage of the AAAS annual meeting.What message would you send into space? Tell us on Twitter and Vine with #msgtospace!last_img read more

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Rejected British Firm Still Claims it Can Buy Force India F1 Team

first_imgThe company, Rich Energy, has claimed to be negotiating with Force India throughout 2018 but has been repeatedly knocked back.Its latest attempt was a £30million sponsorship, tabled as Force India faced an administration hearing last Friday, which was dismissed because it was not deemed an offer that would help the team.Read it at Auto Sport Related Itemslast_img

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