Causing death accused on $500,000 bail

first_imgA Laing Avenue, La Penitence, Georgetown, man who reportedly caused the death of a pillion rider just over three months ago at Houston, Georgetown, was on Friday granted 0,000 bail when he appeared before Chief Magistrate Ann McLennan at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts.Dead: Paulette JosiahMelroy Barnwell, 27, of Laing Avenue, is accused of riding motorcycle CG 8485 in a dangerous manner, thereby causing the death of Paulette Josiah on June 22, 2016.The prosecution’s case is that on the day in question, the defendant was riding at a fast rate and trying to overtake a long line of traffic. It was stated that the defendant tried to dodged traffic that was coming in the opposite direction when he collided with a car.According to the Prosecution’s case, the defendant was without any traffic documents. It was revealed in court that Josiah died of internal bleeding with fractures to her thighs and abdomen.Unrepresented, Barnwell informed the court that he was never questioned about documents for his motorcycle; in fact, he stated that he had all of his documents except for his licence.Paulette Josiah, 19, of Lot 127 Block CC Eccles, East Bank Demerara, succumbed to her injuries at the Georgetown Public Hospital while receiving medical attention.According to earlier reports by Traffic Chief Dion Moore, the motorcycle overtook a vehicle, but at the same time it was noticed that the car was approaching and Barnwell applied brakes, which resulted in Josiah pitching off the motorcycle.The traffic chief had disclosed that both riders were not wearing safety helmets.Barnwell is scheduled to make his next court appearance on October 18, 2016.last_img read more

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Saltman writes no Evel

first_imgWhen Knievel took aim at Idaho’s Snake River gorge in a rocket-powered motorcycle in 1974, Saltman signed on as one of the stunt’s promoters. They agreed that Saltman could write a book about the project afterward. The Skycycle floated into the canyon, and three years later when the book came out, the men’s cordial relationship hit the rocks too. Saltman, by then an executive of 20th Century Fox Sports, says he brightened as Knievel walked toward him on the studio’s backlot, thinking the showman was there to talk about another jump. As two of Knievel’s friends grabbed Saltman, the hero of millions of American kids took an aluminum bat to the older man, who put his hands up to try to protect his head. Because this happened on the kind of studio street used for movie scenes, witnesses evidently thought it was an act – until Knievel fled and Saltman stayed down in a blood puddle. Knievel was sentenced to six months on a county work farm but avoided paying Saltman millions in civil damages by declaring bankruptcy. Saltman recovered from two broken arms, with a steel plate in his left forearm, and went back to business. He says he came to feel pity for Knievel, whose All-American image never was the same. Knievel had been upset at his portrayal in the book, although Saltman says the stuff about drinking, gambling and womanizing was nothing the former Robert Craig Knievel Jr. hadn’t said about himself. “He always said, `I broke his wrist so he couldn’t write again,’ ” Saltman said. And for nearly all this time, Saltman didn’t write again. He let the Knievel episode speak for itself. Until the day a grandson asked a question. “Poppy,” the 13-year-old said, “why don’t you like EvelKnievel?” Saltman, 75 and living near Palm Springs with his wife Mollie, decided to write his own story. He dictated it into a tape recorder, often at the San Fernando Valley facility where Mollie undergoes dialysis. The process, he said, was “catharsis.” The book is called “Fear NoEvel: An Insider’s Look at Hollywood,” but only one chapter is about Knievel, and that was written by co-author Thomas Lyons. It’s mostly – I’ve read excerpts, not the whole book – about the people he’s met and done business with, from Madame Chiang Kai-shek (avisitor to the family home when Saltman was a kid), Tip O’Neill (his godfather) and the Kennedy boys, to Cary Grant, Bob Hope and Steve Allen, to Muhammad Ali, Sugar Ray Robinson and Wayne Gretzky. He even played tennis with Boris Yeltsin once. “I only drop the names of people I know,” Saltman said. A two-hour chat with Sheldon Arthur Saltman over dessert at Jerry’s Famous Deli didn’t turn serious until the man dressed casually in a green cardigan, polo shirt and jeans had spun a few stories about brushes – and direct collisions – with greatness. About watching Andy Williams threaten to cancel an appearance in Jackson, Miss., when a hotel refused to give a room key to saxophonist Plaz Johnson: “Everybody out, everything back in the car,” Saltman remembers Williams saying. “That was heroism.” About working for Jack Kent Cooke, for the Ali-Frazier promotion and with the Lakers in the ’70s: “I didn’t like the way he treated people,” Saltman said, though he admired Cooke’s business sense. “Mr. Cooke had raised the (Lakers) seats on the floor to $25. I said, `Sports is for families. One man isn’t going to pay $100 to take his family to the game.’ Mr. Cooke said, `Not only will they pay $100, but one day they’ll pay a lot more than that.’ Mr. Cooke was prophetic.” About his respect for Ali, and a not-so-prophetic remark ringside at a Jerry Quarry bout: “Ali turned around to my wife and said, `What a terrible way to make a living. My son will carry a briefcase.’ Now his daughter is a fighter.” About discovering that Robinson, greatest pound-for-pound fighter of all time, had one mortal fear: “He was afraid of elevators. I took an elevator to the 16th floor once, and then I waited for him to walk up the stairs. He was Sugar Ray Robinson, so he could do it.” About a bawdy line Father Robert Drinan, the former Massachusetts congressman, dropped on a law-school class: “How is a good contract like a tight skirt?” Saltman recites. “It binds the assignees.” From the days when “The Andy Williams Show” was cutting-edge TV and contracts were sealed with a handshake, Saltman says he has realized the entertainment and sports world has changed for the worse. “I didn’t see it happening,” he said. “I’m not that profound. I was just a guy doing a job. … My job, to a great extent, was to (publicize) people who were true celebrities. Unfortunately, I also had to make heroes out of bums. “There’s no appreciation (now), no respect for history,” Saltman said. “There are a lot of one-night, one-song wonders. The only way a lot of these people stay in the press is by being antisocial, breaking laws. They seem to get by on the shock. The Lindsay Lohans, the Paris Hiltons, the Britney Spears, they don’t respect their audience. “Our values are all wrong. Just because a guy is born with an overactive pituitary gland, that doesn’t make him a valued member of society (or) an example to be followed. Celebrity is a danger in the hands of the wrong people. “In my experience, the real celebrities are those who never take anything for granted. … A real celebrity is somebody who has the ability to give something back – and does.” Of course, Saltman admits, this is no recent trend. He remembers hearing a young movie-maker reject Gregory Peck for a role with the words: “But Mr. Peck, what have you done recently?” He refuses to sound like an old guy complaining about These Kids Today. “I love the kids today,” Saltman said. “There are a lot (of young performers) who are wonderful.” And he hopes his book will help. “There was a dignity in the old days,” Saltman said. “(Because) I’ve had those good old days, maybe I can influence somebody.” In semi-retirement, Saltman is involved with the Tour of California bicycle race, teaches at UC Riverside, and serves on the board of the Kidney Research Association. Recently, after a TV appearance to promote “Fear No Evel,” he said he got a surprise phone call from Matthew Broderick, who thought Saltman would be perfect for a small movie role, which they filmed in a day at the Santa Anita turf club. Another brush with celebrity for a man with a nearly unerring knack for being in the right place at the right time. “It’s all coincidences, all my life,” Saltman said. “Happy ones – except for Knievel.” Kevin Modesti’s column appears in the Daily News three days a week. heymodesti@aol.com (818) 713-3616 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Shelly Saltman didn’t need to get hit over the head by a junk-sports superstar to realize something is wrong with the celebrity culture he helped create. But coming to in intensive care after a baseball-bat attack by Evel Knievel, the daredevil angered by the Snake River promoter’s tell-all book, would tend to waken new perspective in a man, now, wouldn’t it? center_img “I had a near-death experience,” Saltman said the other day across a deli booth in Woodland Hills. “It molded my future thinking. You look at celebrity in a different way after something like that.” Thirty years ago, Saltman was living in Encino and at the height of his career as a behind-the-scenes mover and shaker, a Massachusetts-born sportscaster turned promoter credited with such diverse entrepreneurial triumphs as Ali-Frazier I, the Billie Jean King-Bobby Riggs Battle of the Sexes, the Andy Williams San Diego Golf Classic, Osmond Brothers singing tours and the syndication of “Mr.Ed.” last_img

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Guardiola reveals 10-year plan for Foden

first_img0Shares0000Manchester City’s English midfielder Phil Foden celebrates scoring against Oxford © AFP / Adrian DENNISLONDON, United Kingdom, Sep 26 – Pep Guardiola has backed Manchester City starlet Phil Foden to shine for the next decade after the youngster’s dazzling League Cup display against Oxford.Foden was City’s man of the match and capped his influential performance with his first senior goal in their 3-0 third round win on Tuesday. The 18-year-old midfielder also played a part in the opening two goals for Gabriel Jesus and Riyad Mahrez.England Under-19 international Foden has been tipped for the top for some while, but he hasn’t found it easy to break into the City given the quality the champions already possess.But City manager Guardiola, handing Foden his first start since the Community Shield, is certain his gifted young prodigy will be a star turn at the Etihad Stadium for years to come.“The way he celebrated his first goal was like the final of the World Cup and that is because he is a City fan,” Guardiola said.“My dream is for him to stay 10 years and if Phil stays for 10 years, he can – in the next decade – play regularly and after (that) I don’t know what is going to happen with him.”Oxford boss Karl Robinson likened Foden to former Barcelona midfielder Andreas Iniesta, although Guardiola was keen not to make comparison with one of his previous players.“Wow. These are big, big words. I have said many times we are delighted with Phil,” Guardiola said.“I am not going to say he is going to become Andres Iniesta because it puts pressure on him, Iniesta is by far one of the best players I ever saw in my life so we cannot put the pressure on Phil.“But he has the quality to stay here for 10 years because I think he wants to stay, I think the club wants him to. But step by step, he needs to play regularly, but I think he has all the skills to play with us.”0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Which Tottenham player is capable of doing this again? – Video

first_imgChelsea v Tottenham is live on talkSPORT at 4pm on Sunday 24 February.At Wembley eight years ago – 24 February – Tottenham came from 1-0 down to beat London rivals Chelsea 2-1 in the League Cup final, with Dimitar Berbatov cancelling out Didier Drogba’s first half free-kick and Jonathan Woodgate heading in the winner.Before Woodgate pounced, Spurs’ last major trophy win was in 1999 when Leicester were defeated in the same competition.Victory here denied Chelsea a chance of back-to-back League Cup wins and also ended the Blues’ quadruple hopes. By the end of the 2007/08 season they finished second in the Premier League and were also Champions League runners-up, while their FA Cup assault was ended by Barnsley in the sixth round.Who will be the match-winner on Sunday?For live commentary of the 2015 Capital One Cup final, keep it talkSPORT for the 4pm kick-off. Jonathan Woodgate scored the winning goal against Chelsea in 2008 1last_img read more

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Poll: Who’s better – Oasis or Blur?

first_img Britpop rivals Blur and Oasis 1 It’s 20 years since the ‘Battle of Britpop’, so – without wanting to start a fight – the Drivetime lads wants to know where your allegiances lie…last_img

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TUGANN AN GOOCH INSPIORÁID DO DHALTAÍ GHAIRMSCOIL CHÚ ULADH

first_imgThug an laoch Ciarraíoch Colm “Gooch” Cooper, buaiteoir de 4 bhonn Uile Éireann, cuairt ar Ghairmscoil Chú Uladh Dé hAoine a chuaigh thart mar chuid den chlár ‘AIB Build A Bank”.Ní amhain go bhfuair na scolairí idirbliana comhairle bancéireachta den scoth ón Gooch ach chomh maith le seo fuair siad seans seisiún traenala a dhéanamh leis.Thapaigh na scolairí an deis an méid comhairle is a thiocfadh leo a a fháil uaidh ar chursaí peil gaelach. TUGANN AN GOOCH INSPIORÁID DO DHALTAÍ GHAIRMSCOIL CHÚ ULADH was last modified: February 26th, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:TUGANN AN GOOCH INSPIORÁID DO DHALTAÍ GHAIRMSCOIL CHÚ ULADHlast_img read more

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INISHOWEN FOOTBALL LEAGUE: QUIGLEY’S POINT SWIFTS LIFT STRAND HOTEL FIRST DIVISION TITLE

first_imgStrand Hotel First Division – www.inishowenfl.ieGreencastle FC 1-1 Gleneely ColtsThis was an entertaining end of season encounter even though there was little to play for in terms of league positions.Greencastle started the better when Andrew McLaughlin fed Sean Cavanagh but he shot wide from ten yards.Gleneely replied when a speculative Gavin McLaughlin effort sailed over.Ronan Doherty then for the home side cut in from the right but saw a twenty yards effort saved by Martin Mooney.At the other end the colts JP Lafferty evaded two tackles and fed Billy McCann but he fired wide from a good position.Before the interval Gavin Harkin advanced on the right and fed Doherty but again Mooney saved well.On the restart a Dean McGeoghaghan corner foudn Killian Dougal but his header crashed off the top of the post before Eugene O Donnell advanced from the back and fired over.The colts then went clsoe when McCann crossed for Pete Bond who fired wide.The colts then took the lead on 66 minutes when Bond forced the ball home from a scramble in the home area.Greencastle upped the tempo and Andrew McLaughlin headed over when well placed.They were then awarded a penalty for handball and when Conor Barrow’s effort was svaed by Mooney the rebound fell for Harkin to tap in.Greencastle pushed for a winner with Jude Harkin seeing a shot saved and Barrow firing over from eifght yards as the game ended all even. Carrowmena FC 0-3 Rasheney FCPlaying with the wind in the first half Rasheney dominated possessiona nd it was no surprise when they took the lead on twenty minutes when the home defence failed to clear an inswinging corner and James McConalogue hammered low past Michael Noone from fourteen yards.They continued to press and made it two nil just after the half hour when Damien Friel’s long range shot squirmed under Noone and into the corner.Carrowmena had more possession on the restart but found it hard to create any clear cut chances against a well marshalled Rasheney defence.The visitors sealed the points then on 67 minutes when Friel collected possession on the left and cut in to drill a low shot to the bottom corner from twenty two yards. QPS get the POINT to clinch the titleDunree United 1-1 QPSQPS won the league title with this hard earned share of the spoils played in windy conditions in St Egneys Park. They started the better with Raymond Buchanan seeing a first time effort clip the top of the post in the opening minute.They took the lead on 15 minutes after Buchanan fired a superb free from twenty yards to the top corner past Paul Mcgettigan.Dunree levelled six minutes later when Liam Baldrick fed Conor McBride who turned and fired low from twenty yards to the bottom corner.On 35 minutes a David Laird free found Daniel Mclaughlin whose header was pushed out by Conor McColgan and in the scramble McColgan smothered at the feet of McBride.Dunree started the second period well and when Thomas Mulhern played a ball over the top for Philip McGuinness he fired wide.Good build up by the point then ended with Oisin McCool cutting in from the left and seeing his low shot superbly saved by McGettigan.Dunree replied on 68 minutes when Liam Baldrick fed Daniel McLaughlin who fired over when well placed.The point were then awarded a penalty afetr Dean Barron was upended but Buchanan drove the kick down the middle and McGettigan saved with his legs.There were nervy moments then for the point after McGuinness cross found Ryan Bradley but he was crowded out by the point defence.In the end the poitn gained the draw they needed to clinch the title and these teams will meet again in two weeks in the top four semi final.Tuesday 23rd AprilStrand Hotel First DivisionQPS 10-0 Greencastle FCThe point made absolutely certain there was to be no slip ups when they hammered a weakened Greencastle side.The surprise was that it took until the 30th minute to see them break the deadlock when Adam Harkin sent a ball over the top to Kevin Wallace and he composed himself before drilling low past Dean McGeoghaghan.Dean Barron fired low and wide then before Odhran McColgan released Karl Donnelly to fire low to the net from ten yards.Seannan McColgan then scored with a cross cum shot which deceived McGeoghaghan before on the stroke of half time Odhran McColgan released Raymond Buchanan who calmly picked his spot to drill home.In the opening minute of the second period McGeoghaghan saved well from Donnelly but minutes later after McGeoghaghan had blocked an Odhran McColgan effort the point player laid the ball off to Buchanan to fire to the roof of the net. Buchanan completed his hat trick when he rose at the back post to head home a Paul Grant cross from the left.The visitors suffered another blow when Jamie McCormick was redcarded for two fouls in succession and the point increased their lead when firslty substitute Fergal Buchanan headed home a Seannan McColgan cross before the roles reversed with McColgan supplying Buchanan.Greencastle tried to get one back and there best chance arrived on 66 minutes when James Henry released Conor Barrow who beat a couple of defenders but fired over when well placed.Another substitute Stephen McCarron advanced on the elfta nd cut in before drilling home from a tight angle before Barron completed the scoring with a fine individula goal when he went past two defenders before shooting low to the corner. Rasheney FC 1-1 Buncrana Hearts ResPlayed on Tuesday evening of last week and with nothing major at stake for either of these teams this match turned out to be a reasonably committed affair for an end of season fixture. The home side threatened first and Christy Ivers had a shot saved by Mc Gonagle in the opening minutes while John Mc Laughlin struck a free wide of target. At the other end Gerard Boyle had two early chances the first of which brought a diving save from Jonathan Noone while his second attempt saw him bring down Kieran Mc Daid’s corner and strike wide. After half an hour Alan Friel latched onto some slackness in the home defence, advanced in on goal but shot over and a Boyle snapshot from 16 yards was just wide. Rasheney’s Anthony Doherty then managed to get in behind the visiting defence but the alert Mc Gonagle came off his line to punch clear off Doherty’s head. In a further home attack John Mc Laughlin advanced along the left wing and laid the ball back to Aaron Friel who delivered towards the 6 yard box where David Mc Laughlin just failed to connect. Prior to the interval Mc Laughlin brought a smart save from Mc Gonagle when he turned on the 18 yard line and fired towards goal. The home side moved in front on 57 minutes when David Mc Laughlin controlled a long Noone delivery and laid the ball off to his brother John who advanced into the area and drove low past Mc Gonagle. Buncrana came close to equalising when the home defence had trouble dealing with a Mc Daid corner and the ball was hacked clear after a number of close calls in front of goal. From that clearance Rasheney broke downfield and Burke played the ball forward to David Mc Laughlin who miscued and a visiting defender was able to put behind for a corner. The visitors got back on level terms with 20 minutes remaining. Rasheney conceded a free in central position just outside the area and when Noone parried Boyle’s kick Alan Friel drove to a gaping net. The home side came closest to claiming a winner when Ryan Doherty (J)’s header from a corner was deflected past the base of a post.Buncrana Credit Union Cup Semi FinalMcLaughlin torments Glengad again ! Glengad United 0-1 Clonmany ShamrocksPlayed in windy conditions at the Crua the home side will rus the defensive erros that cost them this semi final as there was very little between the teams.With the wind Glengad had the first chance when terence Doherty collected a return from his throw in wide on the left and his curling effort drifted just over.Midway through the half Clonmany replied after Alan Friel had clsoed keeper Martin Mclaughlin down and half blocked the clearance before he crossed to Marty Doherty but his effort was blocked by a defender.Glengad broke swiftly from this with Patrick McDermott releasing Stephen McLaughlin on the right and his dangerous cross was superbly cleared by Liam Hirrell.At the other end a superb Clonmany break by Jason Devlin on the left saw his cross intercepted by Shane Doherty with Friel lurking.A shot corner then found Devlin on the left but his powerful effort was well svaed by McLaughlin. Friel picked up an injury on 35 minutes and was replaced by Brendan Devlin .Before the break the Clonmany defence were caught out by a long ball over the top which Terence Doherty ran onto but Patrick Harkin advanced and blocked his effort.Minutes after the restart an excellent run and cross by Stephen McLaughlin just eluded Doherty in the centre with the Clonmany defence clearing.The crucial moment of the game came on the hour when firstly Glengad were caught in possession on the edge of the area allowing Brendan Devlin to bear down on Mclaughlin but the keeper blocked and when a defender tried again to walk the ball out he was dispossessed by Mark Mclaughlin only a yard from the endline but he hammered a superb shot from such a tight angle to the top corner.Glengad upped the tempo with Christopher mcLaufhlin glancing a header wide under pressure before Terence Doherty burst between two defenders but saw his shot superbly saved by the legs of Patrick Harkin. Doherty then found himself in space on the edge of the area but his attempted chip drifted wide.At the other end a poor headed back pass found Brendan Devlin who headed straight at McLaughlin from ten yards on 77 minutes.Glengad upped the tempo in the last ten minutes and threw dangerous balls into the area with keeper Harkin twice collecting heavy knocks when dealing with dangerous situations.The Clonmany defence with Hirrell and Michael Grant superb stood firm and they advance to the final where Moville or Rasheney will meet them.INISHOWEN FOOTBALL LEAGUE: QUIGLEY’S POINT SWIFTS LIFT STRAND HOTEL FIRST DIVISION TITLE was last modified: April 29th, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:INISHOWEN FOOTBALL LEAGUE: QUIGLEY’S POINT SWIFTS LIFT STRAND HOTEL FIRST DIVISION TITLElast_img read more

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Holiday Calendar

first_img Winter Magic Lighted Boat Parade will feature boats decorated for the holidays, 5 p.m. Saturday at Castaic Lake Recreation Area, Castaic. Santa and Mrs. Claus will be on hand, along with children’s games, snow, food and entertainment all beginning at 2 p.m. Call (661) 257-4050. 20th annual community Christmas tree lighting will feature holiday entertainment, refreshments, children’s crafts, letters to Santa and face painting, 2-5 p.m. Sunday at Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital, 23845 McBean Parkway, Valencia. Call (661) 253-8082. Senior Cinema will present “A Christmas Story,” 1:30 p.m. Sunday at the SCV Senior Center, 22900 Market St., Newhall. A “Ralphie” look-alike contest will be held for kids who resemble the star of the movie. Suggested donation: $1. Kids are free with an adult. Call (661) 259-9444. Santa Clarita Master Chorale will present “Caroling, Caroling!” 4:30 p.m. Sunday at the Vital Express Center for the Performing Arts at College of the Canyons, 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road, Valencia. Tickets: $19 for general admission and $14 for students and seniors. Call (661) 254-8886 or visit www.scmasterchorale.org. “The Real Meaning of Christmas” will be presented by the Overflow Band and gospel band Tustin Transfer wil also perform, 6:30 p.m. Sunday at Santa Clarita United Methodist Church, 26640 Bouquet Canyon Road, Saugus. Call (661) 297-3783. 53rd annual Festival of Trees will benefit the Optimist Club, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday at the Hilton Burbank Airport & Convention Center, Burbank. Tickets: $50. Call (818) 843-6000. Children’s Holiday Music Program will feature holiday music performed by children from local elementary schools and performers from Vibe Performing Arts Studios, 5-7 p.m. Wednesdays through Dec. 21 outside the food court entrances at Westfield Valencia Town Center, 24201 Valencia Blvd., Valencia. Call (661) 298-1220. Follow the Star, live Nativity scene, will feature more than 100 actors re-enacting the life of Christ, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday through Dec. 11 at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 27265 Luther Drive, Canyon Country. Admission is free. Food or cash donation to the Santa Clarita Valley Food Pantry is encouraged. Call (661) 252-0622 or visit www.followthestar.com. Candlelight Christmas concert will be presented by the Sanctuary Choir, Praise Orchestra and others, 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Dec. 9, and 7 p.m. Dec. 11 at Grace Baptist Church, 22833 Copperhill Drive, Santa Clarita. Tickets are free, but are necessary in order to be seated. Call (661) 296-8737. Cards & Carolers event will feature local high school choirs and cards for people to sign to send to troops overseas, 6-9 p.m. Dec. 9 at the Veterans Memorial Plaza on the corner of Lyons and Walnut avenues, Newhall. Refreshments will be served. Call Jenny Aurit at (661) 255-4918. Sierra Hillbillies Square and Round Dance Club will hold its Holiday Dance and Bazaar, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 9 at the SCV Senior Center, 22900 Market St., Newhall. Call (661) 257-4801. Holiday Concert will feature the Symphonic Band and Jazz Ensemble, 8 p.m. Dec. 9 at the Vital Expres Center for the Performing Arts at College of the Canyons, 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road, Valencia. For tickets, call (661) 362-5304 or visit www.vitalexpresscenter.com. Santa will visit Santa’s Elf Camp, 12:30 and 2 p.m., and a performance by the Hart High Holiday Band, 1 p.m. Dec. 10 at Granary Sqare, located on the corner of McBean Parkway and Arroyo Park Drive, Valencia. Call Linda Hollingsworth at (661) 296-3408. Pet photos and Christmas cards with Santa, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Dec. 10 at Pet Supply, 26831 Bouquet Canyon Road, Saugus. Any combination of people and animals are welcome. Call Pet Assistance at (661) 260-3140. Cowboys and Carols will feature recording artist Christine Ortega and her band, 6-9 p.m. Dec. 10 in the living room at the Hart Mansion at William S. Hart Park, 24151 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $25 and the donation of an unwrapped gift for the needy is requested. Call (661) 254-4584. Choir of the Canyons will present a joyous and rhythmic concert featuring four vocal ensembles, a piano bass and drum jazz trio, 8 p.m. Dec. 10 at the Vital Express Center for the Performing Arts at College of the Canyons, 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road, Valencia. Tickets: $10 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. Call (661) 362-5304 or visit www.vitalexpresscenter.com. Children’s holiday parade, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Dec. 10 starting at Lyons and Walnut avenues and ending at Hart Park in Newhall where there will be snow, visits with Santa, refreshments and awards. Call Jenny Aurit at (661) 255-4318. “International Holidays” is a celebration of Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa and Las Posadas with dances from various countries presented by The Gypsy Folk Ensemble, 2-3 p.m. Dec. 11 in the meeting room at the Valencia Library, 23743 Valencia Blvd., Valencia. Call (661) 259-8942. Christmas concert will feature the music ministry groups bringing the joy of Christmas through bells, dance and song, 6 p.m. Dec. 11 at Santa Clarita United Methodist Church, 26640 Bouquet Canyon Road, Saugus. Call (661) 297-3783. Puppet Show, “Polly Polar Bear and The Prince of the Sea,” will be presented by Swazzle puppeteers, 3:30 p.m. Dec. 13 at the Newhall Library, 22704 9th St., Newhall. Call (661) 259-0750. Holiday stories and craft, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Dec. 14 at the Valencia Library, 23743 W. Valencia Blvd., Valencia. Call (661) 259-8942. Holipalooza, a musical variety-show fundraiser, will feature talented local young people, 7 p.m. Dec. 14 at the Canyon Theatre Guild, 24242 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $15-$25. Call (661) 799-2702. Living Proof will present a contemporary Christmas concert under the direction of Steve Lively, 7 p.m. Dec. 14 at Grace Baptist Church, 22833 Copperhill Drive, Santa Clarita. Admission is free. Call (661) 296-8737. Holiday celebration for children ages 2-12 will feature crafts, games, a bounce house, prizes and a visit from Santa, noon-2 p.m. Dec. 17 at Dr. Richard Rioux Memorial Park, 26233 W. Faulkner Drive, Stevenson Ranch. Call (661) 222-9536. Hanukkah party, 2-4 p.m. Dec. 18 at Granary Square shopping center on the corner of Arroyo Park Drive and McBean Parkway, Valencia. Co-sponsored by Temple Beth Ami. Call Linda Hollingsworth at (661) 296-3408. 6th annual holiday show, titled “Enjoying the Holidays,” 6:30-8:30 p.m. Dec. 18 at Ice Station Valencia, 27745 N. Smyth Drive, Valencia. Call (661) 775-8686 for ticket information. Family caroling party will meet in the parking lot, 6:30 p.m. Dec. 21 at Santa Clarita United Methodist Church, 26640 Bouquet Canyon Road, Saugus. The caravan of singers will provide the gift of song and spread the holiday spirit to surrounding neighborhoods and return to the church around 8 p.m. to warm up with hot beverages and cookies. Call (661) 297-3783. Jam For Jesus will feature some of the top music artists in Southern California playing a variety of styles from pop to rock, 7-9 p.m. Dec. 21 at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 27265 Luther Drive, Canyon Country. Call (661) 252-0622. Christmas Eve services with worship led by the Living Proof Choir and Steve Lively, 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. Dec. 24 at Grace Baptist Church, 22833 Copper Hill Drive, Santa Clarita. Traditional Communion celebration at 11 p.m. Call (661) 296-8737, Ext. 142. Hanukkah pancake breakfast will include breakfast, beverages and Hanukkah fun, 8:30-11:30 a.m. Dec. 25 at a private home in Stevenson Ranch. Cost: $15 for adults; children under 12 are free. Sponsored by Hadassah’s Kochava Group. Call Robin Bratlavsky at (661) 297-2960 or e-mail KochavaGroup@yahoo.com. To submit an event for the Holiday Calendar, contact Sharon Cotal at (661) 257-5256, fax her at (661) 257-5262, e-mail her at sharon.cotal@dailynews.com or write to her at 24800 Avenue Rockefeller, Valencia, CA 91355.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Winter Magic Lighted Boat Parade will feature boats decorated for the holidays, 5 p.m. Saturday at Castaic Lake Recreation Area, Castaic. Santa and Mrs. Claus will be on hand, along with children’s games, snow, food and entertainment all beginning at 2 p.m. Call (661) 257-4050. 20th annual community Christmas tree lighting will feature holiday entertainment, refreshments, children’s crafts, letters to Santa and face painting, 2-5 p.m. Sunday at Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital, 23845 McBean Parkway, Valencia. Call (661) 253-8082. Senior Cinema will present “A Christmas Story,” 1:30 p.m. Sunday at the SCV Senior Center, 22900 Market St., Newhall. A “Ralphie” look-alike contest will be held for kids who resemble the star of the movie. Suggested donation: $1. Kids are free with an adult. Call (661) 259-9444. Santa Clarita Master Chorale will present “Caroling, Caroling!” 4:30 p.m. Sunday at the Vital Express Center for the Performing Arts at College of the Canyons, 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road, Valencia. Tickets: $19 for general admission and $14 for students and seniors. Call (661) 254-8886 or visit www.scmasterchorale.org. “The Real Meaning of Christmas” will be presented by the Overflow Band and gospel band Tustin Transfer wil also perform, 6:30 p.m. Sunday at Santa Clarita United Methodist Church, 26640 Bouquet Canyon Road, Saugus. Call (661) 297-3783. 53rd annual Festival of Trees will benefit the Optimist Club, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday at the Hilton Burbank Airport & Convention Center, Burbank. Tickets: $50. Call (818) 843-6000. Children’s Holiday Music Program will feature holiday music performed by children from local elementary schools and performers from Vibe Performing Arts Studios, 5-7 p.m. Wednesdays through Dec. 21 outside the food court entrances at Westfield Valencia Town Center, 24201 Valencia Blvd., Valencia. Call (661) 298-1220. Follow the Star, live Nativity scene, will feature more than 100 actors re-enacting the life of Christ, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday through Dec. 11 at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 27265 Luther Drive, Canyon Country. Admission is free. Food or cash donation to the Santa Clarita Valley Food Pantry is encouraged. Call (661) 252-0622 or visit www.followthestar.com. Candlelight Christmas concert will be presented by the Sanctuary Choir, Praise Orchestra and others, 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Dec. 9, and 7 p.m. Dec. 11 at Grace Baptist Church, 22833 Copperhill Drive, Santa Clarita. Tickets are free, but are necessary in order to be seated. Call (661) 296-8737. Cards & Carolers event will feature local high school choirs and cards for people to sign to send to troops overseas, 6-9 p.m. Dec. 9 at the Veterans Memorial Plaza on the corner of Lyons and Walnut avenues, Newhall. Refreshments will be served. Call Jenny Aurit at (661) 255-4918. Sierra Hillbillies Square and Round Dance Club will hold its Holiday Dance and Bazaar, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 9 at the SCV Senior Center, 22900 Market St., Newhall. Call (661) 257-4801. Holiday Concert will feature the Symphonic Band and Jazz Ensemble, 8 p.m. Dec. 9 at the Vital Expres Center for the Performing Arts at College of the Canyons, 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road, Valencia. For tickets, call (661) 362-5304 or visit www.vitalexpresscenter.com. Santa will visit Santa’s Elf Camp, 12:30 and 2 p.m., and a performance by the Hart High Holiday Band, 1 p.m. Dec. 10 at Granary Sqare, located on the corner of McBean Parkway and Arroyo Park Drive, Valencia. Call Linda Hollingsworth at (661) 296-3408. Pet photos and Christmas cards with Santa, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Dec. 10 at Pet Supply, 26831 Bouquet Canyon Road, Saugus. Any combination of people and animals are welcome. Call Pet Assistance at (661) 260-3140. Cowboys and Carols will feature recording artist Christine Ortega and her band, 6-9 p.m. Dec. 10 in the living room at the Hart Mansion at William S. Hart Park, 24151 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $25 and the donation of an unwrapped gift for the needy is requested. Call (661) 254-4584. Choir of the Canyons will present a joyous and rhythmic concert featuring four vocal ensembles, a piano bass and drum jazz trio, 8 p.m. Dec. 10 at the Vital Express Center for the Performing Arts at College of the Canyons, 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road, Valencia. Tickets: $10 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. Call (661) 362-5304 or visit www.vitalexpresscenter.com. Children’s holiday parade, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Dec. 10 starting at Lyons and Walnut avenues and ending at Hart Park in Newhall where there will be snow, visits with Santa, refreshments and awards. Call Jenny Aurit at (661) 255-4318. “International Holidays” is a celebration of Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa and Las Posadas with dances from various countries presented by The Gypsy Folk Ensemble, 2-3 p.m. Dec. 11 in the meeting room at the Valencia Library, 23743 Valencia Blvd., Valencia. Call (661) 259-8942. Christmas concert will feature the music ministry groups bringing the joy of Christmas through bells, dance and song, 6 p.m. Dec. 11 at Santa Clarita United Methodist Church, 26640 Bouquet Canyon Road, Saugus. Call (661) 297-3783. Puppet Show, “Polly Polar Bear and The Prince of the Sea,” will be presented by Swazzle puppeteers, 3:30 p.m. Dec. 13 at the Newhall Library, 22704 9th St., Newhall. Call (661) 259-0750. Holiday stories and craft, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Dec. 14 at the Valencia Library, 23743 W. Valencia Blvd., Valencia. Call (661) 259-8942. Holipalooza, a musical variety-show fundraiser, will feature talented local young people, 7 p.m. Dec. 14 at the Canyon Theatre Guild, 24242 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $15-$25. Call (661) 799-2702. Living Proof will present a contemporary Christmas concert under the direction of Steve Lively, 7 p.m. Dec. 14 at Grace Baptist Church, 22833 Copperhill Drive, Santa Clarita. Admission is free. Call (661) 296-8737. Holiday celebration for children ages 2-12 will feature crafts, games, a bounce house, prizes and a visit from Santa, noon-2 p.m. Dec. 17 at Dr. Richard Rioux Memorial Park, 26233 W. Faulkner Drive, Stevenson Ranch. Call (661) 222-9536. Hanukkah party, 2-4 p.m. Dec. 18 at Granary Square shopping center on the corner of Arroyo Park Drive and McBean Parkway, Valencia. Co-sponsored by Temple Beth Ami. Call Linda Hollingsworth at (661) 296-3408. 6th annual holiday show, titled “Enjoying the Holidays,” 6:30-8:30 p.m. Dec. 18 at Ice Station Valencia, 27745 N. Smyth Drive, Valencia. Call (661) 775-8686 for ticket information. Family caroling party will meet in the parking lot, 6:30 p.m. Dec. 21 at Santa Clarita United Methodist Church, 26640 Bouquet Canyon Road, Saugus. The caravan of singers will provide the gift of song and spread the holiday spirit to surrounding neighborhoods and return to the church around 8 p.m. to warm up with hot beverages and cookies. Call (661) 297-3783. Jam For Jesus will feature some of the top music artists in Southern California playing a variety of styles from pop to rock, 7-9 p.m. Dec. 21 at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 27265 Luther Drive, Canyon Country. Call (661) 252-0622. Christmas Eve services with worship led by the Living Proof Choir and Steve Lively, 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. Dec. 24 at Grace Baptist Church, 22833 Copper Hill Drive, Santa Clarita. Traditional Communion celebration at 11 p.m. Call (661) 296-8737, Ext. 142. Hanukkah pancake breakfast will include breakfast, beverages and Hanukkah fun, 8:30-11:30 a.m. Dec. 25 at a private home in Stevenson Ranch. Cost: $15 for adults; children under 12 are free. Sponsored by Hadassah’s Kochava Group. Call Robin Bratlavsky at (661) 297-2960 or e-mail KochavaGroup@yahoo.com. To submit an event for the Holiday Calendar, contact Sharon Cotal at (661) 257-5256, fax her at (661) 257-5262, e-mail her at sharon.cotal@dailynews.com or write to her at 24800 Avenue Rockefeller, Valencia, CA 91355.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!,Marionette show, titled “Hello Christmas, Hola Navidad,” 4 p.m. today at the Santa Clarita Community Center, 24406 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Admission is free but seating is limited. Call Dora Shepro at (661) 254-4678. Holiday Ball will feature the music of Jimmy Sax and Flat Broke, 7:30-10:30 p.m. today at the SCV Senior Center, 22900 Market St., Newhall. Admission: $5. Call (661) 259-9444. “A Christmas Carol” will be presented, 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays and 6:30 p.m. Dec. 11 and 18 at the Canyon Theatre Guild, 24242 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $13-$17 for adults and $10-$13 for students and seniors. Call (661) 799-2702. “The Farndale Avenue Housing Estate Townswomen’s Guild Dramatic Society’s Production of A Christmas Carol” will be presented, 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through Dec. 23 at the Repertory East Playhouse, 24266 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $16 for adults and $14 for students and seniors. Call (661) 288-0000. Pet photos and Christmas cards with Santa, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday at Pet Stop, 16522 Soledad Canyon Road, Canyon Country. Any combination of people and animals are welcome. Call Pet Assistance at (661) 260-3140. Free pet pictures with Santa, noon-3 p.m. Saturday at Granary Square shopping center on the corner of Arroyo Park Drive and McBean Parkway, Valencia. The Saugus High choir will perform at noon and the Hart High Carolers will perform at 1 p.m. Call Linda Hollingsworth at (661) 296-3408. Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital’s Holiday Home Tour will feature local homes decorated for the holidays, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Saturday with a special preview gala Friday. The hospital’s Holiday Boutique will coincide with the home tour from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, 23233 W. Lyons Ave., Newhall. Call (661) 253-8082. Holiday Craft Fair, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at Placerita Canyon Nature Center, 19152 Placerita Canyon Road, Newhall. Create and decorate your own holiday wreaths, centerpieces and candles with beautiful natural treasures. Call (661) 259-7721. Holiday arts and crafts fair will feature artists and crafts people displaying their unique wares, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at Central Park, 27150 Bouquet Canyon Road, Saugus. Call Nicki Voss Stern at (661) 286-4079. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals Pet photos and Christmas cards with Santa, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday at Pet Stop, 16522 Soledad Canyon Road, Canyon Country. Any combination of people and animals are welcome. Call Pet Assistance at (661) 260-3140. Free pet pictures with Santa, noon-3 p.m. Saturday at Granary Square shopping center on the corner of Arroyo Park Drive and McBean Parkway, Valencia. The Saugus High choir will perform at noon and the Hart High Carolers will perform at 1 p.m. Call Linda Hollingsworth at (661) 296-3408. Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital’s Holiday Home Tour will feature local homes decorated for the holidays, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Saturday with a special preview gala Friday. The hospital’s Holiday Boutique will coincide with the home tour from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, 23233 W. Lyons Ave., Newhall. Call (661) 253-8082. Holiday Craft Fair, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at Placerita Canyon Nature Center, 19152 Placerita Canyon Road, Newhall. Create and decorate your own holiday wreaths, centerpieces and candles with beautiful natural treasures. Call (661) 259-7721. Holiday arts and crafts fair will feature artists and crafts people displaying their unique wares, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at Central Park, 27150 Bouquet Canyon Road, Saugus. Call Nicki Voss Stern at (661) 286-4079. Marionette show, titled “Hello Christmas, Hola Navidad,” 4 p.m. today at the Santa Clarita Community Center, 24406 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Admission is free but seating is limited. Call Dora Shepro at (661) 254-4678. Holiday Ball will feature the music of Jimmy Sax and Flat Broke, 7:30-10:30 p.m. today at the SCV Senior Center, 22900 Market St., Newhall. Admission: $5. Call (661) 259-9444. “A Christmas Carol” will be presented, 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays and 6:30 p.m. Dec. 11 and 18 at the Canyon Theatre Guild, 24242 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $13-$17 for adults and $10-$13 for students and seniors. Call (661) 799-2702. “The Farndale Avenue Housing Estate Townswomen’s Guild Dramatic Society’s Production of A Christmas Carol” will be presented, 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through Dec. 23 at the Repertory East Playhouse, 24266 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $16 for adults and $14 for students and seniors. Call (661) 288-0000. last_img read more

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Warriors’ Klay Thompson ruled out until after NBA All-Star break in February

first_imgThe update was not unexpected. ACL … The first order of business during the Golden State Warriors’ media day Monday was an update on five-time All-Star Klay Thompson.“He’s doing fine,” said Warriors GM Bob Myers during his introductory chat with reporters.“Fine,” being a relative term.“We’ll have another update on him probably around the All-Star break,” Myers said. “Don’t construe that as if we think he’ll be back by the All-Star break. That just means we’ll have an update then.”last_img read more

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Cell Operations Amaze, Inspire

first_img An analysis of complexes with large chimeric oligonucleotides shows that the basic tails of both proteins are attached flexibly, enabling them to bind rigid duplex DNA segments extending from the core in different directions. Our results indicate that the basic tails of DEAD-box proteins contribute to RNA-chaperone activity by binding nonspecifically to large RNA substrates and flexibly tethering the core for the unwinding of neighboring duplexes. Electric cells:  You’ve heard of electric eels; how about electric bacteria?  Researchers at Harvard, publishing in Science, were curious about the electrical properties of cells: Antenna tower construction crew:  Cilia are complex organelles in the cell membrane that protrude into the intercellular medium, where they can sense the surroundings and perform other functions.  Some are motile, like the cilia in the human respiratory tract that sweep foreign matter out with coordinated strokes.  Cells build cilia using molecular ore-carts powered by kinesin-2 motors in a process called intra-flagellar transport (IFT), in which components are hoisted up into the cilium on trackways.  Scientists suspected that additional factors regulate the construction of cilia.  Now, two American molecular biologists publishing in Current Biology identified one such member of the construction crew, named KLP6, that moves independently of kinesin-2 and acts to reduce its velocity.  Note: they found this in a particular kind of cell in a roundworm. Gatekeeper dance:  Ion channels play many vital roles in our bodies.  According to Science Daily, they are “essential for the regulation of important biological processes such as smooth muscle tone and neuronal excitability.”  One such channel, named BK, performs large conductance of potassium ions in the presence of calcium ions.  Scientists had thought that all ion channels followed a unified theory of activation.  Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have found that BK channels are not that simple.  DNA orchestra:  An article on PhysOrg about DNA translation begins, “Just like orchestra musicians waiting for their cue, RNA polymerase II molecules are poised at the start site of many developmentally controlled genes, waiting for the ‘Go!’-signal to read their part of the genomic symphony.”  Researchers at Stowers Institute for Medical Research found that Super Elongation Complex (SEC), an assembly of some 10 transcription elongation factors, conveys the downbeat to the translation machine and “helps paused RNA polymerases to come online and start transcribing the gene ahead”.  This quick-start device “reduces the number of steps required for productive transcription and allows cells to respond quickly to internal and external signals,” one of the researchers explained.  Continuing the orchestra metaphor, the article said, “Transcriptional control by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a tightly orchestrated, multistep process that requires the concerted action of a large number of players to successfully transcribe the full length of genes.” Quality control inspectors:  At the exit gate of the ribosome, where new proteins have just been assembled, molecular machines called chaperones stand at the ready to help them fold properly.  A Stanford team studied two of these, the Signal Recognition Particle (SNP) and Nascent Chain associated Complex (NAC), which have the remarkable ability to work on a wide variety of proteins, helping them fold properly.  Publishing in PLoS Biology, they said, The Science Daily article reported that a team at Howard Hughes Medical Institute produced the highest-resolution diagram ever of a sodium channel .  In this excerpt, you can sense the fascination as the team looked down the channel for the first time in such detail: “We hope to gain insight into why they selectively let in sodium ions and nothing else,” the researchers said, “and how they respond to changes in the cell membrane voltage, how they open and close, and how they generate electrical signals.”  The researchers have already spotted intriguing molecular movement, such as rolling motions of some functional parts of the sodium channel molecule and their connectors…. Bacterial membrane potential provides a major component of the driving force for oxidative phosphorylation, membrane transport, and flagellar motion. Yet this voltage is inaccessible to techniques of conventional electrophysiology, owing to the small size of bacteria and the presence of a cell wall. Little is known about the electrophysiology of bacteria at the level of single cells. So they checked.  They observed E. coli bacteria producing electrical spikes at a rate of about one per second.  The electrical charge is generated by ion channels in the membrane that create electrical gradients, working against the natural tendency of charges to cancel out.  “Spiking was sensitive to chemical and physical perturbations and coincided with rapid efflux of a small-molecule fluorophore,” they said, “suggesting that bacterial efflux machinery may be electrically regulated.”  In other words, they were not observing a stochastic effect, but a coordinated action of many ion channels that must organize their active transport mechanisms as a unit.  They speculated that the spiking represents a stress response by the organism.  Coordinated electrical response is known in higher organisms, like electric eels and humans, but “These simple estimates show that some of the tenets of neuronal electrophysiology may need rethinking in the context of bacteria.” Salt of the cell:  If you enjoy having a healthy heart, brain and pancreas, thank your sodium channels.  Like the BK potassium channels, sodium channels regulate a wide range of physiological activities.  According to Science Daily, “Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels underlie inherited forms of epilepsy, migraine headaches, heart rhythm disturbances, periodic paralysis, and some pain syndromes.”  When the dentist numbs your gums, he is effectively blocking the local sodium channels from doing their job – sending pain messages to the brain.  “The ribosome uses two active mechanisms to unwind messenger RNA during translation.” (Nature)  “Crystal structures of [lambda] exonuclease in complex with DNA suggest an electrostatic ratchet mechanism for processivity.” (PNAS) “Mechanism of activation gating in the full-length KcsA K+ channel.” (PNAS) We further show interactions between the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase and Trp-Trp (WW) domains amplify the conduit response, and alter binding properties at the remote peptidyl-prolyl isomerase active site. These results suggest that specific input conformations can gate dynamic changes that support intraprotein communication.  Such gating may help control the propagation of chemical signals by Pin1, and other modular signaling proteins. RNA linemen:  We’ve all watched in the movies how rescue workers toss a line over a wall or pole so that they can climb up.  Something like that happens with some machines that unwind RNA.  In PNAS, a team of researchers described a helicase with the awful name “mitochondrial DEAD-box protein Mss116p” that acts as a general RNA chaperone.  (They really should give these machines better names, like the Chuck Norris Hammerlock Clamp.)  Not only does the machine clamp down on the RNA, it first latches onto it by means of a couple of tails that fasten onto the RNA, tethering the machine to its target: Transport vesicles are created when coat proteins assemble on a flat membrane, select cargo, and deform the membrane into a bud. The budded vesicle is then carried to its target organelle, where it docks by means of ‘tethers’ before undergoing membrane fusion. The vesicle coat was once thought to fall off as soon as budding was complete, but we now know the coat is important for binding the tethering factors that help the vesicle identify the correct organelle. Coat proteins and tethers must be removed before fusion can take place, but what triggers their disassembly has always been a mystery. A paper recently published in Nature now shows that, when one kind of transport vesicle docks with its target membrane, it encounters a kinase that breaks the bond between the coat proteins and the tethers, kick-starting the disassembly process. The problem she was considering was how the steps are coordinated: “how can a vesicle hang onto its coat long enough to reach its target, but shed it once it arrives?”  Part of the answer appears to be in good management.  Though not yet fully understood, “These results paint a picture of Sec23 as a master regulator of budding and fusion, participating in successive interactions that are regulated by phosphorylation.”  She added, though, that “While this is an attractive model, it may not be the whole story.”  Other protein machines interact in vital ways with Sec23.  Her diagram illustrates several pieces locking together like Lego blocks, arriving and releasing at precise times in a process reminiscent of a space shuttle docking with the space station.  This complexity undermines a claim on PhysOrg that “Endocytosis is simpler than expected.”  There, researchers in the Netherlands found a simpler model for the way the coat molecules (clathrin) rearrange from flat to spherical during the process of vesicle formation.  That’s only a minor aspect of a much larger multi-stage process involving many protein parts, and as this animation shows, the geodesic-style clathrin molecules are pretty clever little building blocks. Rubber baby copper pumper:  In “Structural biology: A platform for copper pumps,” Nigel Robinson, writing in Nature, said, “Copper is vital to most cells, but too much is lethal. The structure of a protein that pumps copper ions out of the cytosol provides insight into both the pumping mechanism and how certain mutations in the protein cause disease.”  His diagram shows a molecular machine called LpCopA, comprised of at least 5 protein domains, that safely pumps copper ions out of the cell.  First, the ions have to be delivered to the pump with special chaperone molecules that know how to handle it safely.  Inside the pump are three binding sites that deliver the ion to an L-shaped platform that gently holds the ion while undergoing conformational changes like a lever arm, ejecting the ion safely to the outside.  Then the platform resets for the next round.  Serious brain diseases can occur when these pumps are damaged by mutations. Our results provide new insights into SRP selectivity and reveal that NAC is a general cotranslational chaperone. We found surprising differential substrate specificity for the three subunits of NAC, which appear to recognize distinct features within nascent chains. Our results also revealed a partial overlap between the sets of nascent polypeptides that interact with NAC and SRP, respectively, and showed that NAC modulates SRP specificity and fidelity in vivo. These findings give us new insight into the dynamic interplay of chaperones acting on nascent chains. Stereo amplifier:  Researchers at Notre Dame and Virginia Tech found that an important signaling enzyme named Pin1 is stereoselective.  “Pin1 is a modular enzyme that accelerates the cis-trans isomerization of phosphorylated-Ser/Thr-Pro (pS/T-P) motifs found in numerous signaling proteins regulating cell growth and neuronal survival,” they wrote in PNAS, showing that conduit response differs if the enzyme binds on one channel instead of the other.  Here’s the scoop for bio-geeks: A student’s view of a cell under a light microscope is misleading.  It reveals only a tiny fraction of what is really going on.  Within that package of life, invisible to the student’s gaze, complex machines work together in cellular factories.  Signals pass back and forth in complex networks.  Libraries of code are transcribed and translated into machine parts.  Security guards open and close gates, and emergency response teams repair damage.  Even a simple bacterial cell has the equivalent of a city council, library, fire department, police department, industrial center, transportation infrastructure, disposal and recycling center, civil defense system and much more.  Here are just a few snippets from recent scientific papers that zoom in past the microscope lens to reveal wonders unimagined just a few decades ago. Halfway down in the activation channel, a certain amino acid residue M314 in one of the transmembrane proteins does a little dance, “rotating its side chain from a position in the closed state not exposed to the hydrophilic pore to one that is so exposed in the open state.”  This conformational change is part of a larger validation process that ensures only the right ions make it through the selectivity filter.  M314 “might not actually form the part of the activation gate that blocks ion passage, but that motions in the deep pore may be required for blocking ion passage elsewhere in the channel,”  the article explained.  So much for unified theories; “Importantly, they say, the study demonstrates that BK channel activation is not an open-and-shut case as previously suspected.” Readers may wish to investigate these additional papers published this month with intriguing titles: Dirigible doughboys:  Sometimes cells build dirigible-like “transport vesicles” out of parts of the cell membrane, to float large cargo molecules to other organelles in the cell.  This complex process involves many players, including proteins that coat the vesicle, and dockers that hold the dirigible when it comes in for landing; in the case of the cell, though, the dirigible’s coat fuses with the target organelle, so that the contents can enter safely through a membrane tunnel.  Elizabeth Conibear [U of British Columbia] introduced some of the complexity of this process, called endocytosis, in Current Biology, saying, “When a coated transport vesicle docks with its target membrane, the coat proteins and docking machinery must be released before the membranes can fuse. A recent paper shows how this disassembly is triggered at precisely the right time.”  The first paragraph of her review article described just a fraction of what goes on in these operations: Time does not permit referencing all these papers; click on the links to go to the abstracts.  These represent part of the backlog of papers on cellular wonders.  Each of them deserve a complete discussion.  Many of them talk about how parts are “highly conserved [i.e., unevolved] from bacteria to humans,” and none of them attempt even a minimally-plausible account of how they might have emerged by chance.  In these exciting days of opening the cellular black box, we should be standing in awe of the design (and the Designer), not ascribing the machinery inside to mindless, purposeless nothingness.  The record speaks for itself.  Researchers need Darwin like alcoholics need wine (Dar-wine).  It turns them into WINOs, Wesearchers In Name Only (to be pronounced with a drunken drawl).(Visited 25 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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