Category: jidfoivs

Kendrick Lamar To Curate Marvel’s “Black Panther” Soundtrack; Shares First Cut With SZA [Listen]

Kendrick Lamar To Curate Marvel’s “Black Panther” Soundtrack; Shares First Cut With SZA [Listen]

first_imgAccording to a statement made late last week, superstar rapper Kendrick Lamar and Top Dawg Entertainment (TDE) CEO Anthony “Top Dawg” Tiffith will curate and produce Black Panther: The Album, the soundtrack from the highly-awaited silver screen version of Marvel‘s Black Panther comic. The comic and its lead character were both landmark events when they came out in the mid-to-late ’60, marking the first time a superhero of African descent was featured in an American comic book.Kendrick was chosen for the project by director Ryan Coogler, who said in a press release, “I am honored to be working with such an incredible artist whose work has been so inspirational, and whose artistic themes align with those we explore in the film. I can’t wait for the world to hear what Kendrick and TDE have in store.” As Kendrick explains, “The magnitude of this film showcases a great marriage of art and culture. I’m truly honored to contribute my knowledge of producing sound and writing music alongside Ryan and Marvel’s vision.”Listen to “All The Stars”, the new Kendrick Lamar/SZA cut off the Lamar-curated soundtrack for upcoming Marvel Studios film Black Panther below via KendrickLamarVEVO:Kendrick Lamar is an apt choice to head up the musical end of this culturally significant film. In addition to his generally enormous profile in the modern music landscape, he has never been shy about making bold social and cultural statements with his work. Through both his art and his actions, Lamar has been extremely vocal about societal issues facing black Americans today. Each of his albums–particularly 2015’s To Pimp A Butterfly–challenges entrenched beliefs, channels bubbling institutionalized violence, and proposes an alternative narrative:Watch the video for “Alright” from Kendrick’s 2015 album To Pimp A Butterfly below via KendrickLamarVEVO:You can pre-order Black Panter: The Album here. Black Panther hits theaters on February 16th, 2018.[h/t – Consequence of Sound]last_img read more

PHOTOS: Lettuce And The Motet @ Wiltern Theatre In LA 2/15/18

PHOTOS: Lettuce And The Motet @ Wiltern Theatre In LA 2/15/18

first_imgBrandon Weil Load remaining images The animating power of music may be its most elemental feature, at least as far as its mass-market appeal is concerned. It’s certainly the aspect that’s made jam music the phenomenon it’s become over the decades, and it’s what shone through most brightly when Lettuce and The Motet took over the Wiltern Theatre in Los Angeles the day after Valentine’s.That is, for this author, anyway. After eight straight overnight shifts covering the Winter Olympics, I arrived in L.A.’s Koreatown dazed and confused in ways that may be beyond even the imagination of Matthew McConaughey. The fog of professional, coffee-induced insomnia made a favorite and familiar venue like the Wiltern feel foreign, the thrumbing drums and funky beats of The Motet and Lettuce seem, at first, like mere disturbances of slumber.But string enough of those horns together with some rhythm, guitar and bass, and that noise is transformed, by dint of context and crowd, into a waking, energizing signal, a call to action whose proper response requires little more than gesticulation and gyration. Keeping the beat is encouraged, but really, the act of physical expression—any physical expression—is what matters most.For this dozing observer, the music of The Motet and Lettuce was the easiest sipping shot of espresso ever to pass lips and slip into the soul. It turned a living zombie into a “Weekend at Bernie’s” redux, one shuffle step at a time, forward through a thick cloud of California smoke. Luckily, the additional sounds of Rashawn Ross (Dave Matthews Band)–who’d been with the band since the previous night in San Diego–was extra intensifying.That’s the beauty of modern music, with its ever-extending trend toward energetic movement. It seems simple enough—like the sport of soccer shifting away from long passes in favor of short exchanges and dominating possession—but an important one nonetheless. Across styles, genres and audience demographics, music has become more and more danceable.Jam music is no exception to that rule, certainly not with double doses of The Motet and Lettuce to get the masses grooving. And while the Wiltern was less than packed for the occasion, that left more than enough room for revelers to celebrate the music freely, and for the exhausted among them to partake with only a fleeting conscience.After completing their show at the Wiltern Theatre, Lettuce continued on to the Fox Theatre in Oakland, CA, where they were joined by Jason Crosby (Phil Lesh, Widespread Panic).See below for a full gallery of the Los Angeles show from photographer Brandon Weil, and catch Lettuce as they continue through the west coast and then back east with The Motet and Galactic.Lettuce 2018 DatesFebruary 14 San Diego, CA @ Observatory North Park*February 15 Los Angeles, CA @ Wiltern Theatre*February 16 Oakland, CA @ Fox Theater*February 17 Portland, OR @ Roseland TheaterFebruary 18 Seattle, WA @ ShowboxFebruary 20 Missoula, MT @ The WilmaFebruary 22 St. Paul, MN @ Palace Theatre^February 23 Chicago, IL @ Riviera Theatre^February 24 Detroit, MI @ St. Andrews Hall^February 25 Cleveland, OH @ House of Blues^March 22 Huntington, NY @ The Paramount*March 23 Port Chester, NY @ Capitol Theatre*March 24 Port Chester, NY @ Capitol Theatre*March 26 Hartford, CT @ Infinity HallMarch 28 Richmond, VA @ The NationalMarch 29 Greensboro, NC @ Blind TigerMarch 30 Covington, KY @ Madison TheaterMarch 31 Covington, KY @ Madison Theater*With support from Motet^Co-bill with GalacticLettuce & The Motet | Wiltern | Los Angeles, CA | 2/15/18last_img read more

Simmer nears boil in Hong Kong

Simmer nears boil in Hong Kong

first_img Related Looking to China for lessons on helping the poor Young people face a lot of challenges in Hong Kong. It’s incredibly expensive, and jobs are difficult to come by. Finding housing is also very difficult; many people still have to live with their parents in small apartments because it’s so expensive otherwise. All that contributes to this air of pessimism that some of the young people tend to have. And like a lot of young people, when there is an avenue to vent your frustrations, you are likely to follow it. So this question around the extradition treaty provided that vehicle for frustrations to be vented. But what’s interesting is it has been an extraordinary number of people, and a very wide range of people as well.GAZETTE: What does that mix of protesters say to you?SAICH: We have seen it before when there have been obvious challenges to what people interpreted as being Hong Kong freedoms. So I wasn’t surprised that there was a protest, but I was surprised by the number that turned out. Even if the lower figures are true, a very significant percentage of the Hong Kong population took to the streets. And I think there are other things that play into it. There is frustration with mainlanders coming down to Hong Kong, often those who are quite wealthy, often bringing a lot of their businesses with them, buying up apartments and so on. I often avoid speaking Mandarin when I am in Hong Kong. A lot of local Hong Kongers don’t like it because they have their own language, Cantonese. So when you speak Mandarin, particularly if you are Chinese, you are singled out as someone from the mainland and that doesn’t always go down so well. And then of course there are stories of people coming down from Beijing and using the hospital facilities and other services and the perception that this is somehow squeezing out Hong Kong citizens. I have no idea whether that’s true or not, but it plays into that general perception. GAZETTE: Looking ahead, what do you see happening after 2047? Will Hong Kong be able to hold onto its autonomy until then or even perhaps after?SAICH: Well, if I knew the answer to that, I wouldn’t be an academic; I would probably be playing the casino. So much depends on what happens and what evolves in Beijing. If the political system, the overwhelming desire to control as many aspects of state and society as you can, persists, then by extension you would think that would also find its way through into Hong Kong. And as I said earlier, some people, admittedly not the most senior leaders, have already floated the idea that the 1997 agreement is already a historic document and doesn’t really match the current situation. Now, if that atmosphere becomes more pervasive from the mainland, you might see the autonomy getting squeezed earlier.Interview has been edited and condensed. Hundreds of thousands filled the streets of Hong Kong on Sunday, the most recent in a series of protests against a proposed extradition bill that would send those accused of certain crimes to mainland China for trial. In a major reversal Tuesday, Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, declared the proposal “dead.” Many view the demonstrations as the greatest challenge to Beijing’s authority in Hong Kong since British officials turned the former colony back to China in 1997 under a “one country, two systems” declaration that afforded Hong Kong more autonomy until 2047.Tony Saich says tensions and unrest over China’s tightening grip and eventual takeover have been present from the start. And the director of the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation and Daewoo Professor of International Affairs at Harvard Kennedy School argues the protests underscore the stark differences between the identities and cultures of insular, developing China and cosmopolitan, capitalistic Hong Kong that go far beyond economic self-interest. The Gazette spoke with Saich about what the future may bring. Tony SaichQ&AGAZETTE: It seemed like at the beginning the “one country, two systems” plan was working well, but that China has been tightening the reins. Why?SAICH: I think there has always been a question of how long China might let the autonomy proceed. And there have been comments, although not officially sanctioned by the most senior leaders, that really the 50-year role is already past its sell-by date. That has been floated by a number of people on the mainland, and I think those in Hong Kong have felt very sensitive to those sentiments, really believing that 50 years is 50 years.What has happened, I think, are a number of significant events in which China has tried to push through measures that challenge Hong Kong’s identity, and those have created uncertainty about how long the leadership in Beijing will really stay committed to that 50-year process. Right now, it’s around this extradition treaty. There have been other causes before around a security bill, the question of introduction of patriotic education, and all those events have set off strong protests and demonstrations in Hong Kong by locals who feel these actions are really beginning to infringe on the agreement and that Beijing is moving toward tightening the constraints.GAZETTE: There has been concern that the protests could lead to another Tiananmen Square-style crackdown. Do you think something like that could happen?SAICH: I think it would really have to reach an absolutely extreme point. It’s been rumored that one of China’s vice premiers went to Shenzhen and carried a message from President Xi Jinping telling the Hong Kong authorities that he did not want to see extreme violence in their response because he knows the world is watching. And it would be a massive public-relations disaster for Beijing if things really began to slip and slide out of control. Having said that, in some ways the protests have allowed Beijing to get better control of the narrative by stressing the need for the rule of law and peaceful demonstration and so forth. Chinese leaders were at an absolute disadvantage prior to that.,GAZETTE: I am curious about the reaction to the protests in China. It appears many mainland Chinese have reacted negatively to the Hong Kong demonstrations. Why?SAICH: I think the question is: What do people in mainland China really know about what is going on, even educated members of the middle class? They probably are not going to get full information, and to be honest they are probably not that interested in digging it out. It’s not a life-or-death, make-or-break issue for the middle class in mainland China. And I think many of them have bought into the Communist Party’s narrative that “without us there will be chaos and that we can steer the ship of economic growth forward and that any disruption through protest would be damaging to that.” If they do have that mentality then they probably apply that to the situation in Hong Kong and think the instability might be undermining and destabilizing for economic growth. And, if you present it from Beijing’s point of view, that murderers and rapists of course should be extradited from Hong Kong to be tried in the mainland if that’s where they committed the crime, and if you don’t really know a lot of the background to Hong Kong and the context within which the demonstrations are taking place, that could seem a perfectly reasonable argument.GAZETTE: Some have suggested that those in Hong Kong were happy to forgo certain freedoms in order to maintain their economic prosperity.SAICH: I think that’s really where Beijing has seriously misread the situation in Hong Kong. Their strategy essentially was to work with the elites in Hong Kong and help Hong Kong millionaires become billionaires and give them honorary positions in the National People’s Congress or in the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference. I think they felt that knotting and tying together Hong Kong’s economic fortunes with those of the mainland would be sufficient to ensure that Hong Kong could be well managed.But I think what we have seen with continued annual protests about Tiananmen on June 4, the events that I mentioned earlier, and then this question around the extradition treaty, is that for many in Hong Kong, identity is important and overrides the question of simple economic self-interest. What we have seen is that the number of people, particularly young people, who identify themselves as Hong Kongers and do not see themselves as being Chinese has really grown as they perceive Beijing instituting more constraints. One opinion poll from 2018 conducted by Hong Kong University shows that of those living in Hong Kong between the ages of 18 and 29, only 3 percent identified themselves as Chinese. And that really would indicate that Beijing has not won the battle for hearts and minds and has actually lost the youth in Hong Kong. I think that a lot of young people in Hong Kong don’t really see a positive future there, and a lot of people are disillusioned about the potential for Hong Kong’s future. So one of the dangers is that Hong Kong may lose a lot of its young people as they look for an exit strategy. GAZETTE: How do you think Hong Kongers differ in their thoughts, aspirations, politics, and values from those living in mainland China? What exactly are they fighting for?SAICH: I think there are different starting points for that. Above all, Hong Kong was a British colony for 150 years. It wasn’t a democracy, admittedly, but it had a much freer, much more open society and more international engagement than the mainland until recently, and I think that produced a different culture and a different approach, which is distinctly cosmopolitan, distinctly open. And even though Chinese cities are much more cosmopolitan than they used to be, they are still not very experienced globally in the way that Hong Kong is. In addition, some of the younger people growing up don’t remember the period of the British colonial authority, but they have been promised this greater autonomy. They are in many ways global citizens, and I think they fear that is being closed down and that increasingly Beijing will dictate to them what they can and cannot do. Events such as the kidnapping of the booksellers and others being taken across the border has made them feel like those freedoms are actually very fragile. They also feel like the chief executive, Carrie Lam, really represents Beijing’s interests rather than the interests of the people of Hong Kong. “I think the question is: What do people in mainland China really know about what is going on, even educated members of the middle class? They probably are not going to get full information, and to be honest they are probably not that interested in digging it out.” Concerted push for democracy is driving Chinese area’s ‘umbrella revolution’ The rising in Hong Kong Harvard’s many research ties to that nation reflect broad engagement, as President Bacow visits last_img read more

‘The best thing to do is stop ‘other-ing’ people’

‘The best thing to do is stop ‘other-ing’ people’

first_imgEditor’s note: This article is the first in a series on disability at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s. Today’s story examines the language surrounding disability.The 650 students registered with the Sara Bea Center for Students with Disabilities have the same abilities, interests, motivations and desires as the rest of the student body, Scott Howland, coordinator at Disability Services, said. “You might have certain barriers that need to be overcome to reach the same goals,” he said. “I think sometimes with disability we tend to talk about it more as kind of patronizing — that we see someone with a disability as someone who would be the recipient of our service, of our goodwill, type of thing. So more of an approach of, ‘We’re providing these services and accommodations more for equality, giving them equal access.’”Grace Agolia, a junior at Notre Dame who is deaf and uses a cochlear implant, said she thinks “disability” is “the best possible term we could use.”“It’s not pejorative, in my opinion. If you’re talking about words like ‘differently-abled,’ ‘special,’ ‘abnormality,’ ‘defective’ — those are pejorative terms,” she said. “I especially don’t like ‘differently-abled’ because it just avoids the fact that the person has a disability. Yes, people with disabilities have a differing perspective on life, and I think that’s something that people should enter into conversation about, ask them about, but that doesn’t mean they are ‘differently-abled.’”Agolia said she dislikes when people say “we all have disabilities.”“That’s just bad. Because it demeans the experience of people who have a physical disability,” she said. “I would agree that we all have things that set us back, but disability is a very specific type of setback, and I don’t think that’s something that can be applied to everyone. You have to respect the experiences of people with disabilities. I try to say ‘people with disabilities’ instead of ‘disabled persons’ because of the ontological connotations.”Agolia said she does not believe there should be a binary opposition between “disabled” and “non-disabled,” “deaf” and “not-deaf.” “Yes, we have those different experiences, but there doesn’t have to be a dichotomy — the experiences can be integrated, in order to have a fuller vision of what the world is, of what our existence is like,” she said. “It lends us new perspectives into the human experience.”Elizabeth Anthony, a senior at Notre Dame who has autoimmune conditions, said there is a sense of discomfort in discussing disabilities.“But I think that’s kind of a societal thing — disabilities make people uncomfortable, I think,” she said. “And I think it makes people with invisible disabilities really uncomfortable to identify themselves as disabled because number one, they feel like other people won’t understand, and number two, it can be a very defeating thing to yourself, to say, ‘I need these extra things.’“Especially because — I mean, in high school, I slept six hours a night and I ran cross country, and I did everything and I thought it was awesome. And then coming in my freshman year, I had to be significantly knocked down a few notches, usually by getting sick. So I’d be pushing myself too hard and I’d get sick and I’d be like, ‘OK, I need to step back.’“And it’s really hard to admit that to yourself when you’re used to living a certain way, so I think that’s part of it too. People may not want to admit that they need the help that they might have to offer.” Megan Crowley, a freshman at Notre Dame, has Pompe disease, which progressively weakens muscles.Editor’s note: Crowley spoke to The Observer with the assistance of her nurse, Debbie Larsen, who is quoted below. Crowley said she doesn’t see the word “disability” as a bad thing. “She knows she has a disability, she embraces the fact that she has a disability. She can, however, see that someone might find that offensive. But for her, she knows she has a disability. If someone uses it in a negative way to hurt you, then that would be a problem, but she doesn’t think it’s always offensive,” Larsen said. Jessica Ping, a freshman at Notre Dame who has CHILD syndrome, said she does not look at herself as disabled.“I get that that is the connotation that comes with being as I am, so I don’t mind the word, but I would never describe myself as that,” she said. “I would never put that in my top descriptors of myself as a person because I think it’s beyond the disability. I’m just an average teenaged girl trying to survive college.”Ross Kloeber, a first-year Notre Dame law student who is hard of hearing, said he does identify as disabled.“I am disabled, I have a disability. Maybe at some point, I was more reserved about it. I don’t necessarily feel like it’s a bad thing anymore,” he said.“The best thing to do is stop ‘other-ing’ people,” Kloeber said.“Sometimes with disability, when it is visible you can kind of pick something out and realize that they’re different than you — and that’s really not a distinction because everybody’s different than you,” he said.Bridget Dedelow, a senior at Saint Mary’s who has cerebral palsy, said the phrase “differently able” downplays the actual disability, and that there seem to be two sides of the spectrum: people who try to overcompensate with wording and people who are offensive.“I’ve had people call me a cripple, and that’s just rude,” she said. “There will always be a negative connotation — there isn’t a happy word for disabled. People with disabilities do live super happy lives, but it’s not always recognizable on the surface.”Dedelow said she has stopped trying to hide her disability. “I hid for a lot of years — sat up straighter [and] walked more smoothly, trying to overcompensate and that’s exhausting,” she said. “It wasn’t an epiphany moment, but I tried to hide out of fear of isolation and I was able to let that go. … It’s not about comparing myself, it’s about coming to that understanding.” People with disabilities are not “less valid,” but “less able in some ways,” Dedelow said. “I want ‘open-minded’ stamped on people’s foreheads, because if you don’t talk to people about it you won’t know,” she said. Fiona Van Antwerp, a sophomore at Saint Mary’s, said she has become comfortable talking about her dyslexia.“At times I wished I didn’t have dyslexia because it’s frustrating, but once I learned how to compensate for it, I’m alright,” she said. Accepting her disability hasn’t been easy, but Van Antwerp said her parents’ acceptance and love for her helped her to accept her dyslexia.“My mom when I was little tried to find out everything she could about how to help me,” she said. “If they can accept [my dyslexia], then I can accept it.”News Writers Megan Valley and Madison Jaros contributed to this story. Tags: disability, Disability series 2016, Observer Disability Series 2016, Office of Disability Services, Sara Bea Center for Students with Disabilitieslast_img read more

Vermont Telecommunications Authority announces new board members

Vermont Telecommunications Authority announces new board members

first_imgThe Vermont Telecommunications Authority recently welcomed new Board members, Pam Mackenzie, Chairwoman, and Representative Sam Young of Glover.  Ms. Mackenzie, a former Comcast executive and active Board member with Chittenden County United Way and Vice Chair of the Vermont Public Television Board of Directors was appointed by Governor Shumlin.  Prior to joining Comcast in 2006, Mackenzie held various positions within the cable industry, including serving as Area Vice President of Adelphia Communications of Northern Ohio, Area Vice President for Adelphia in Western Pennsylvania. Mackenzie has also served as Regional Manager and General Manager for several systems in Arizona and California. Before entering the cable industry, Mackenzie held several posts at the White House during the Carter Administration, including Director of Logistics, Management Analyst and Assistant Director of Presidential Correspondence. Throughout her career, Mackenzie has been consistently involved in the communities she manages and is involved in many industry and community organizations. She served on the executive committee for the national board of directors for Women in Cable & Telecommunications (WICT), serving as the Chapter Development Chair, and also served as a WICT New England Chapter Advisor. Mackenzie was one of three advisors across the country that was recognized by WICT as a Chapter Advisor of the Year in 2008.  Sam Young is the owner of Think or Sink, a web development and Internet marketing company. He has developed the web sites for a number of Vermont businesses.  Mr. Young’s appointments to the House Committee on Commerce and Economic Development and the Joint Committee on Information Technology positioned him well to develop a firm grasp of the challenges to infrastructure development in rural Vermont. From those seats he was a proponent of Act 53, which changed some of the powers and duties of the VTA and ultimately lead to a $10 million 2 year capital budget allocation to the VTA.Other Board members include Trevor Crist, of Inntopia, Karen Marshall, Chief of ConnectVT, and Deputy State Treasurer, Steve Wisloski. Peter Meyer, a former staff member of the Public Service Board and Vice Chairman has been on the VTA Board since its inception in 2007.last_img read more

Colombia Wants To Contribute Its Antidrug Experience To Afghanistan

Colombia Wants To Contribute Its Antidrug Experience To Afghanistan

first_imgBy Dialogo April 06, 2009 Colombia wants to contribute its anti-narcotics and counter-terrorism expertise to Afghanistan, a country of which Bogotá is supportive because both nations suffer from the effects of drugs and terrorist violence. This was said by Francisco Jose Lloreda, Colombia’s Ambassador to Holland, who participated in the conference on Afghanistan which was held in The Hague, and in which more than 90 countries and institutions renewed commitments to the Asian country. Lloreda told Efe that the contribution of Colombia to Afghanistan’s future “could be in the dismantling of mines, the fight against narcotics, and the support of infrastructure development.” The Colombian ambassador said that Bogotá has maintained “for a year” talks with “various countries” aimed at, among other issues, obtaining sponsorship for specific projects geared toward the future of Afghanistan. As to whether Colombia would provide funding directly to Afghanistan, Lloreda specified that “this decision has not yet been made,” but it has not been ruled out. Lloreda said that the situations in Colombia and Afghanistan “are different” but that both countries share the experience of being “victims of terrorism” and drugs. The diplomat explained that Colombia has accepted the invitation to the conference because “we felt we have something to contribute.” He added that “the future of Afghanistan is not as far as geography shows it, especially in a globalized world where crime has no boundaries.” On the objectives of the conference in The Hague, he said that the challenge is “to move forward on the precision of strategic issues” because the broad participation in the forum “has already confirmed the intention to reaffirm political commitments” to Afghanistan.last_img read more

World Leaders Unite to Help the People of Venezuela

World Leaders Unite to Help the People of Venezuela

first_imgBy Andréa Barretto/Diálogo February 28, 2019 On February 25, 2019, leaders from the Lima Group met in Bogotá, Colombia, to discuss the Venezuelan crisis. The meeting followed three days marked by tension and violence at Venezuela’s shared borders with Colombia and Brazil. “To leaders around the world: It’s time,” said U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, at the meeting in Bogotá. “There can be no bystanders in Venezuela’s struggle for freedom.” Violence erupted and led to riots when the Bolivarian National Forces (GNB, in Spanish) shut the borders to stop the entry of humanitarian aid to Venezuela from Colombia and Brazil. Acting upon Maduro’s orders, Venezuelan service members blocked sections of roads and bridges. Conflicts with demonstrators and supporters of interim President Juan Guaidó ensued, as they attempted to gain access to food and medication coming from the United States and Brazil. The United States planned to deliver about 180 tons of supplies through Colombia, including food, toiletries, and medical supplies for roughly 25,000 people. The U.S. military delivered the humanitarian aid to the Colombian city of Cúcuta. In cooperation with the U.S. government, Brazil aimed to provide 200 tons of food, including rice, beans, and salt, as well as first-aid kits. People killed and injured Five trucks arrived at the border between Colombia and Venezuela, ready to deliver the aid to Venezuelan people. As the standoff between demonstrators and GNB service members intensified, Chavista troops set two trucks on fire on a bridge on the border line between both countries. The troops’ actions prompted the other trucks to return to Cúcuta without delivering the aid. Conflicts between troops loyal to Maduro and opponents resulted in 285 injured. The United Nations (UN) condemned the humanitarian aid destruction. At a press briefing, Stéphane Dujarric, spokesman for the UN Secretary-General said “any burning of humanitarian aid is to be condemned.” Violence at the border between Brazil and Venezuela resulted in four casualties and dozens injured between February 23 and 24. The two trucks that departed from Pacaraima city, Roraima state, Brazil, reached Venezuela, but the riots forced them to turn back. According to Brazilian presidential spokesman Otávio Rêgo Barros, the food and medicine will be stored in a warehouse at Boa Vista, Roraima, until the border reopens. “The medication and food that we carry have a long shelf life. Two, three months [of storage] are not a concern for us,” said Rêgo Barros. Citing the violent episodes at the border, the Brazilian government announced on February 24 that the Ministry of Defense extended the capabilities of Operation Shelter, increasing medical personnel and expanding the medical evacuation system, which facilitates the transfer of patients who require hospitalization. Members of the Brazilian Armed Forces and partner agencies conduct the operation since 2018 to mitigate the suffering of the Venezuelan people who enter Brazil seeking support. Lima Group Eleven leaders from the Lima Group took part in the Bogotá meeting. Created in Lima, Peru in 2017, the group of countries of the Americas seeks to find solutions to the Venezuelan crisis. Pence and Guaidó, who is recognized by some 50 countries as Venezuela’s legitimate president, joined the meeting. In a statement, the Lima Group condemned “the deliberate actions of Nicolás Maduro’s illegitimate regime”. The group maintained their commitment for a peaceful transition to democratic rule and called on the International Criminal Court to consider “the grave humanitarian situation in Venezuela, Nicolás Maduro’s criminal actions against the civil population, and the denial of access to international assistance a crime against humanity.” “These men worked to block aid for people in need and suppress peaceful protests; their actions will not go unpunished,” Pence said. “In the days ahead, the United States will announce even firmer sanctions on the regime’s corrupt financial networks.”last_img read more

Man Found Shot to Death in Brentwood

Man Found Shot to Death in Brentwood

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 27-year-old man was found shot to death in a parked car in his hometown of Brentwood on Monday morning, Suffolk County police said.A 911 caller reported finding an injured man in a Nissan Sentra, parked in front of 152 Twinlawns Ave., with bullet holes through the car’s window at 6:20 a.m., police said.Officers who responded to the scene found the victim dead of a gunshot wound. The victim was later identified as Jose Matilde Lainez-Murcia.Homicide Squad detectives are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information on this incident to call them at 631-852-6392 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS. All calls will be kept confidential.last_img read more

Indonesian couples hold off wedding plans for better days … after COVID-19

Indonesian couples hold off wedding plans for better days … after COVID-19

first_imgApril 11 was supposed to be the happiest day of her life so far for Anifa Ludfiani and Firdausyah Bela, and the couple had looked forward to their families watch them as they tied the knot on that date in Sidoarjo, East Java.The venue has been booked and all expenses paid, from the caterer to the wedding organizer. The couple had also printed invitations for 300 guests to attend their wedding reception.But the growing spread of COVID-19 in Indonesia has forced Anifa and her 29-year-old fiance to rethink their plans. In the end, they decided to postpone the reception.The couple also wondered whether they should continue with their wedding on April 5, as they did not want the occasion to pose a greater risk of infection.”I am really dejected about the whole situation right now,” the 25-year-old bride-to-be told The Jakarta Post on Wednesday.”Yet, it will be sad if only a few people show up at my wedding,” Anifa said, wistfully. Read also: COVID-19: Indonesia suspends visa-free policy, expands ban for people from worst-hit countriesIt was the same for Mochammad Dimar Zankar, 33, and his fiancée, Winda Marienda, 27. The Jakartan couple were forced to cancel their wedding reception and pre-nuptial ceremonies scheduled for April after a handful of close relatives declined their invitation.”Friends of my father and father-in-law have said they cannot come due to a fear of COVID-19, so we had to cancel the wedding party,” said Dimar.But Dimar said he and Winda were standing firm about holding their wedding on April 18, with only close family in attendance.These couples are only two among many hundreds, even thousands of couples in the country – and likely around the world – who have seen the coronavirus pandemic laying waste to their best-laid plans, leaving them with no choice but to cancel what was supposed to be one of the happiest days of their lives.The local outbreak has infected 227 Indonesians to date, and comes during the height of the wedding season in the country, which usually falls just before and after the Ramadan-Idul Fitri holiday.The central government has responded by calling on the public to practice “social distancing” – maintaining a minimum distance of 1 meter – to stem the spread of the virus. Authorities have also advised against large gatherings to reduce the risk of wider transmission.Brand manager Safina Loebis of RefnaWedding in South Jakarta, said that the wedding organizer’s clients had all decided to postpone their wedding plans due to the COVID-19 outbreak in the country.Read also: Wedding bell blues: Coronavirus crashes party for couples, planners”The clients of four weddings scheduled on March 22, March 29, April 4 and April 18 have all asked to postpone,” Safina told the Post.Safina said the wedding industry fully understood the unprecedented situation and were not charging extra for postponements. She added that the ensuing costs to organizers remained to be seen, since all clients had postponed indefinitely, without setting a later date, time or venue.Things were different for Eky Triwulan Kusumaningrum and Demas Setyo Wahyudi, who had just celebrated their wedding last Sunday with around 300 invited guests at the Omah Ndoro hall in Cibubur, East Jakarta.A week before their wedding, Eky said she had heard the news on Indonesia’s first two confirmed cases – traced to Depok, West Java, which is close to her wedding venue.Despite their concerns about the outbreak, the couple thought it impossible for them to postpone their wedding ceremony, as everything had been prepared and set to proceed.”We prepared hand sanitizers and put up posters encouraging people to greet each other using the “Namaste” and the “Vulcan salute” instead of shaking hands at the wedding,” she said, referring respectively to the Indian Hindu greeting and the greeting popularized in Star Trek films. (trn)Topics :last_img read more

Brisbane apartment rents rise despite inner city oversupply

Brisbane apartment rents rise despite inner city oversupply

first_imgGeneric photo of West End apartments development – Picture: Richard WalkerBRISBANE apartment rents rose sharply in July, despite an oversupply of stock in the inner city.Rent.com.au has released its latest report based on last month’s property leasing data and it shows a shift in median rental property prices, rental affordability and the price of house and apartment living by Walk Score®.Brisbane was among five capitals to record an increase in apartment rents, with the river city’s median unit rent jumping from $380 to $395/week — just below Melbourne’s at $400/week.But Brisbane house rents stagnated in July — dropping 1.2 per cent to $410/week. More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home2 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor2 hours agoBrisbane house rents dropped 1.2 per cent in July, according to rent.com.au. GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HERE The only capital city to record a bigger drop during the month was Canberra, which saw median house rents fall 2 per cent to $490/week. Brisbane also has the cheapest houses for rent in the most walkable suburbs, according to a new report. Furnished flat less than $40,000 Buyer pays millions in cash for this house Queensland’s fastest growing areas The report compared its Walk Score® data to price-per-room data across all leased properties in Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide and Perth during the month, aiming to identify price trends in areas with varying levels of walkability. It found Brisbane had the most affordable houses for rent in suburbs where daily errands don’t require a car, at $186.70 a week.last_img read more