Big first for Hastings Primary

first_imgThe Scotiabank Kiddy Cricket Festival came to an exciting end on Wednesday at Sabina Park with Hastings Primary School of Trelawny copping their first champion trophy after being in the runners-up position several times.     They defeated defending champions New Works Primary of Westmoreland.  Scores: Hastings 156 for 3; New Works 119 all out. Two hundred and twenty four schools – 16 per parish – started the competition in January with intra-parish matches.  The parish winners then played their neighbouring parishes after which the top seven and the best losers were invited to display their cricket at the festival.   The awards function was held immediately following the festival. New entrants Brandon Hill Primary of Clarendon took home the most improved school trophy for reaching the semi-finals.  They also bagged the most disciplined school trophy. Individual prizes went to male and female cricketers per category. Best bowlers:  Michael Murray of Hastings and Marsha Dixon of Santa Cruz. Best fielders:  Jermaine Edwards of Hastings and Shanique Wallace of Santa Cruz. Best batters:  Javid Simpson of New Works and Katie Wilmot of New Works The Kiddy Cricketers will display their skills during an international cricket match in Jamaica later this year while the top 50 players will be invited to a camp in the summer after which the best three will receive a $50,000 bursary. This year marks the 15th year of Scotiabank Kiddy Cricket. Coach of the winning team, Leon Reid, endorsed Kiddy Cricket while saying that the children were excited to play the game and it had a positive impact on them.    Co-ordinator Philip Service praised the competition and noted that two current national players came through Kiddy Cricket.  They are Jermaine Blackwood and Brandon King.last_img read more

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Safety plea issued by Donegal Town Chamber after Christmas lights accidents

first_imgA safety warning has been issued after two incidents in which lorries collided with Christmas lights in Donegal Town.The warning was issued to the drivers of lorries, HGVs and buses by Donegal Town Chamber.A statement from the Chamber said “We realise that this is an extremely busy time of year and are aware of the difficulties faced by lorry drivers in all our towns and villages with ongoing deliveries pickups etc. “Unfortunately we have had two instances over the weekend where our overhead Christmas Lights display strings have been damaged by large vehicles passing through.“As these are erected by a voluntary committee and volunteers, we are asking the drivers of large vehicles to be extra vigilant of our overhead lights when passing through and where possible to avoid the Town Centre as obviously these damages will incur extra costs.“We depend on the generosity of the Business Community of Donegal Town for their financial support in lighting up the town.”Meanwhile, the official annual Switch on will take place this Thursday 28th of November at 7.00pm on the Diamond. Safety plea issued by Donegal Town Chamber after Christmas lights accidents was last modified: November 25th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CHristmasDonegal TownLIGHTSsafetytrucksWarninglast_img read more

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Peas and Prosperity

first_imgA healthy plant community relies on natural mechanisms that agricultural scientists can tap into.When agricultural chemist George Washington Carver urged poor southern farmers to plant peanuts, they resisted. But Carver knew why it was in their best interest to rotate crops with legumes (members of the pea family): they fix nitrogen. Although nitrogen is abundant on earth, comprising 78% of the atmosphere, it cannot be used by plants unless its tough triple bonds are broken. Once dinitrogen atoms are separated, they can be combined into useful molecules like ammonia, and included in life’s proteins. The fixing of nitrogen is actually done by microbes that live in symbiotic relationships with the roots of legumes. The plants construct nodules to nurture the bacteria. Inside the bacteria, specialized enzymes called nitrogenases break the triple bonds at room temperature—a feat scientists have not yet been able to imitate. Fixing nitrogen commercially requires high temperatures and pressures. Lightning is another source that can fix atmospheric nitrogen.Like Carver, agronomist Perry Miller of the University of Montana is encouraging farmers to plant legumes. Science Daily explains why crop rotation with legumes will bring “peas on earth” to farmers facing economic swings and high expenses for commercial fertilizers. “A cropping system that is more reliant on soil organic nitrogen fixed by legumes and less reliant on expensive bag fertilizer seems to economically stabilize [farm income] in a very important way,” Miller advises.Blue lupines are legumes that fix nitrogen in the soil. Photo by David Coppedge.Miller is not alone. Over in Europe, an international team of scientists feels it’s “win-win situation for the environment and the economy when it comes to introducing legumes into agricultural systems,” PhysOrg reports. Only 2% of the arable land in Europe is used for legumes, which include clovers, lupins, lucerne and faba beans. Though not as attractive as crops for farmers wanting a quick return on investment, the benefits smooth out the highs and lows, showing good profit margins over the long term.  “Contrary to popular belief, these findings show that the benefits of diversifying cropping systems through the inclusion of legumes can be both environmental and economic,” the team reported in Frontiers in Plant Science. “Based on real case-study regions, the results demonstrate great potential for implementation.”Natural fertilization is not limited to the roots. Scientists at the University of Washington have shown that bacteria in the branches of poplar trees can also fix nitrogen. Science Daily says that the microbiome is highly diverse, able to deliver fixed nitrogen to the tree, with no root nodules required. “This could have significant implications for common agricultural crop plants,” the article says. “The microbes the team has isolated from wild poplar and willow plants help corn, tomatoes and peppers, as well as turf grasses and forest trees to grow with less fertilizer.” Plant microbiologist Sharon Doty was intrigued by wild plants thriving in rocky, sandy soils with few nutrients. She looked at the potential of microbes for improving agriculture:Fertilizers are synthesized using fossil fuels, so costs can fluctuate wildly. Because fertilizers are used for growing everything from agricultural and bioenergy crops and trees for lumber to the grass in golf courses, this volatile pricing and uncertain availability affects everyone.“Having access to the key microbial strains that help wild plants thrive on just rocks and sand will be crucial for moving agriculture, bioenergy and forestry away from a dependence on chemical fertilizers and towards a more natural way of boosting plant productivity,” Doty said.Agricultural scientists in Australia are looking at a different approach to reducing dependence on commercial fertilizers. Two scientists are studying columella cells that grow at the tips of roots, seeking to determine the epigenetic factors that regulate their uptake of nutrients from the soil. PhysOrg points out that numerous cell types exist in roots, with complex interactions. “On top of the genetic code within these cells sits another code, known as the epigenome, which can direct which genes are switched on and off,” Tim Stuart of the University of Western Australia says. “While epigenetic patterns across different plant organs and tissues have previously been studied, this is the first finding of differences between individual cell types of the root.”Given their country’s history of famines, Chinese scientists are also very interested in agricultural productivity. In PNAS, a paper looks at more detail into the symbiosis between plant and nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Plants send chemical signals to the bacteria, encouraging the growth of root nodules and stimulating nitrogen fixation. “Our results,” they say, “provide a mechanism for facilitative root–root interactions explaining how species diversity may enhance ecosystem productivity with important implications for developing sustainable agriculture.”Our natural human inclinations are often wasteful and impulsive. Wanting a quick return, we use fossil fuels to create fertilizers that pollute the atmosphere and land. We spread aluminum sprinkler systems over many acres to give our crops artificial rainfall. If a desert plant can grow out of dry sand, and a tree out of bare rock, they can teach us a thing or two about sustainable agriculture.Notice that two of our heroes of creation science, George Washington Carver and Gregor Mendel, performed their most important work with peas and peanuts—two members of the legume family. When Carver prayed for wisdom, asking “Mr. Creator, why did you make the peanut?” he was rewarded for his inquisitive mind into the wise purposes of God with a series of discoveries that still astonishes scientists today.Those who deny the Creator’s purposes court disaster. Trofim Lysenko rejected Mendelian genetics on ideological grounds. Though he also disputed some of Darwin’s ideas, he was a materialist and evolutionist. The famines that resulted from his flawed ideas killed millions.Moses said it is the Lord who gives us the power to make wealth. A portion of that power comes in the rationality with which He endowed mankind to use as good stewards of the earth, seeking to understand the designs around us for insight, application and the pursuit of happiness.  Carver didn’t get an audible response from Mr. Creator to his question. He got inspiration to apply his rationality in the lab to find the answer, and came up with 300 uses for peanuts.We believe the path to productivity is asking, like Carver, the “why” question, assuming God had a wise purpose in the way he set up the natural economy. The goodness of God is hereby evident to all people, even foolish Greeks who worshiped idols. Paul told the men of Lystra that the Creator did not leave himself without witness: “He has shown kindness by giving you rain from heaven and crops in their seasons; he provides you with plenty of food and fills your hearts with joy” (Acts 14:17). That common grace has a purpose: “We are bringing you good news, telling you to turn from these worthless things to the living God, who made the heavens and the earth and the sea and everything in them.”(Visited 24 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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SA, French firms urged to collaborate

first_img15 October 2013 French and South African companies have been encouraged to work together on the industrialisation of South Africa and the African continent. Speaking at a business forum on the sidelines of the state visit by French President Francois Hollande on Monday, Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies said that although France was among the country’s top five partners in the European Union (EU), a lot more still needed to be done. “A lot of work needs to be done to recover the trade relations that the two countries shared before the global economic crisis,” Davies said. France is among South Africa’s top 10 trading partners. The two countries have significant and sizeable trade and investment relations. Davies said that what needed to be improved were partnerships between the two countries on industrialisation. He said the African continent was recognised as one of the growing frontiers in the world and that the African region needed to integrate. “One of the priorities should be regional integration, because as a continent we are divided into many smaller markets. It is important to generate a market for industrialisation to address the real economic issues that make it hard for industrialisation – one of which is infrastructure.” South Africa is engaged in a massive infrastructure programme, with the Southern African Development Community (SADC) having also set up infrastructure programmes, and these should form the basis for industrialisation, Davies said. French Minister of Foreign Trade Nicole Bricq told the forum that French companies based in South Africa understood South Africa’s commitment to redress the inequalities of the past and respected the country’s regulations. She said foreign trade could be enhanced by better knowledge of each other. “Many South African companies export goods from France, which boosts exports for our country. South African companies should also be encouraged to invest in France in order to restore balance in trade with the EU. If South African companies come, this will reduce the deficit and increase employment – which is a common concern for both countries.” Davies and Bricq agreed on Monday to revive the Joint Economic Committee between South Africa and France. The committee was established in 1995 to promote and strengthen trade and industrial co-operation between the two countries. Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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Portuguese man-of-war spotted on Goa beach

first_imgThe Drishti Marine, Goa Tourism’s beach safety agency has issued an advisory for tourists as well as residents to refrain from venturing into the sea on Baga beach, as lifeguards have spotted a cluster of Portuguese man-of-war, a jelly-like marine organism, washed ashore on the popular beach in north Goa.The marine organism is commonly known as ‘bluebottle’ or ‘floating terror’.The bluebottle spotted on Friday were less than an inch in size, said Drishti Marine in its communiction to the State Tourism department.Drishti Marine has cautioned that the bluebottle could possibly be present in the waters or along the shoreline. Even wading into the waters is not advisable during the monsoon as the sea and weather conditions are not favourable for swimming. While most jellyfish stings are harmless to humans and cause only a mild irritation, species like the bluebottle are venomous and can cause harm on contact. Even a dead bluebottle washed up on shore can deliver a sting, said the advisory to tourists.First aidFirst aid that can be delivered include washing the stung area with hot water, as heat breaks down the toxins. Vinegar is also known to diffuse the poison present in the tentacles. Ice packs can reduce swelling but a visit to the doctor is recommended, the advisory added.last_img read more

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