Faster forensics, quicker prosecutions

first_img13 October 2010 The South African Police Service’s Forensic Science Laboratories have made a significant dent in their backlog, leading to more efficient prosecution and conviction of criminals in the country. Addressing journalists in Pretoria on Tuesday, Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa said the backlog of cases being handled by the Forensic Science Laboratories had decreased by 19% between 1 April 2009 and 31 March 2010. The backlog in ballistics had decreased by 39%, in biology investigation by 33%, and in questioned documents by 21%. Mthethwa attributed the success to the turnaround strategy that was implemented in forensics. The laboratories play a critical role in the prosecution and conviction of criminals. However, most of them were not functioning optimally. Court cases, depending on forensic evidence, were being delayed, lost or dropped. International experts have been assisting the South African Police Service in identifying the causes of the backlogs, and have developed remedial steps to resolve them. Since February this year, an overhaul of human resources and skills, and upgrading of equipment, was undertaken to improve capacity. “We are pleased with this progress, while also mindful that the current functioning of the Forensic Science Laboratories (FSL) is far from ideal,” Mthethwa said. “We shall continue to strive to ensure that we transform the FSL into a world-class unit.” Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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Get Those Wrists Ready: Samsung Reportedly Outing Smartwatch Sept 4

first_imgWhat it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … adriana lee The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Bloomberg reports that Samsung will indeed announce its own smartwatch, the Galaxy Gear, at a press event on September 4.Not that smartwatches are anything new—see Pebble and Sony. And the rumor of a Samsung device has been going on for months. But if the wire service’s two anonymous sources are right, Samsung Galaxy Gear will be having its coming-out party next month—a week before Apple holds a similar launch event for its own new products.Apple has long been rumored to be working on its own wristworn smart device, unofficially dubbed the iWatch. Both patent filings and job listings strongly suggest Apple’s plans are real. See also: Arm Race: Samsung To Build A Smartwatch TooApple’s not the only company supposedly trying to make our wrists smarter. Others—including Google and Microsoft—are reportedly racing to bring their own smartwatches to market. The reason why is obvious: If any one of these companies can blaze this trail, it offers a substantial advantage. The market for smartwatches isn’t as saturated as tablets or phones, so the winner here has a better chance of standing out and locking even more users into its respective platforms.The wrist, in short, is viewed as virgin territory for gadgets. Though ReadWrite’s editor-in-chief may rail against wearable wrist-bound devices, he’s shouting at the waves. Smartwatches now officially seem to be the “It” thing in tech.According to this latest report, Galaxy Gear will be an Android device that makes calls, surfs the Web and manages email messages. It won’t, however, sport a flexible screen, at least not in the this version, though Samsung’s working on it for future devices.  Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfacescenter_img Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Tags:#Arm Race#mobile#Samsung#smartwatch#Wearable Computing#wearables Related Posts last_img read more

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2013 helicopter crash: pilot ignored poor visibility, says report

first_imgMumbai: An investigation by the Aircraft Accident Investigation Board into the September 2013 helicopter crash in Tukawade, Thane, which killed all five on board, has revealed the accident was caused due to the pilot continuing the flight in very poor visibility conditions with insufficient ground clearance and hitting a hill due to spatial disorientation.The report, prepared in 2014 but made public only earlier this week, also mentions that non-functioning of the weather radar and non-familiarity of the pilot with the terrain along with lack of valid training on the specific type of helicopter, contributed to the accident.A three-member committee headed by R S Passi as chairman, Captain V M Satish Koikal and K Chandra Shekhar as members, investigated the crash. The helicopter, belonging to United Helicharters, was flying from Juhu to Aurangabad when it crashed on September 29, 2013. The deceased included Captain Surendra Bhadoria, co-pilot Alan Martin, additional pilot Anshu Matha, engineer Yatin Wakade and technician Dean D’Souza.The report said that from the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) transcript, it was clear the crew experienced poor visibility right from the beginning. “The pilot was not familiar with the terrain. The radar was unserviceable. The flight was continued in poor visibility and without adequate terrain clearance. The pilot tried to maintain ground contact, resulting in not having safe ground clearance,” the report read.The report also mentions the early take-off of the helicopter from Juhu had been necessitated by refusal of Aurangabad air traffic controllers to extend watch hours (duty timings) in the morning, thereby indirectly contributing to the accident. The committee also said it appeared that the pilot was under mental compulsion to complete the flight as there was not much flying by the company in the recent past and fulfilling the flying contract from Nagpur for 30 days was important from the commercial point of view.“No action was taken by the crew as per the existing instructions or procedures. The crew did not review the situation, nor did they abandon further flight due to the weather situation. As seen from the CVR readout they were encountering clouds almost from the beginning, the crew displayed undue eagerness to press ahead with the flight as per the flight plan in VFR despite poor visibility. At a distance of 85 kms from Mumbai, the pilot decided to fly on instruments,” the report revealed.last_img read more

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Abhishek Banerjee sets target of over 250 seats for Trinamool in 2021 poll

first_imgSenior Trinamool Congress (TMC) leader and MP Abhishek Banerjee on Wednesday set a target of winning 250 plus seats in the next Legislative Assembly poll. Abhishek, who heads the youth wing of the TMC and is nephew of Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee, said the BJP’s thinking of winning Bengal has no basis.“In the next assembly poll in 2021, we should fight to win 250 plus seats in the state. The BJP thinks it can win Bengal. But they are wrong. If our party supremo Mamata Banerjee permits, we would score 10 goals against BJP everyday and they won’t stand a chance against us,” Mr. Abhishek said while addressing TMC’s students wing-Trinamool Chatra Parishad- foundation day rally here. The total strength of the West Bengal assembly is 294. They (BJP) has emptied the coffers of central government and RBI and are lecturing others on financial issues, he said. While referring to Reserve Bank of India (RBI)’s decision to give Rs 1.76 lakh crore to the Centre, Abhishek said the reserve money of the central bank has also been exhausted due to the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government. BJP’s West Bengal unit president Dilip Ghosh, while reacting to Abhishek’s claim, said he is living in fool’s paradise.“He is living in fool’s paradise if he thinks that TMC will win 250 seats. The TMC would find it tough to get even 30 seats and acquire main opposition party status,” Ghosh said. The BJP, in the general election this year, bagged 18 of the 42 seats in the state, four less than the ruling TMC.The TMC’s tally came down from 34 in 2014 to 22 seats. In the last few years, the saffron party has made deep inroads in Bengal and emerged as the main challenger to the ruling TMC by pushing the Congress and the Left Front to distant third and fourth positions respectively. It’s leaders are now asserting that their next target was to unseat Mamata Banerjee in the 2021 assembly elections.last_img read more

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