Embracing fatherhood – ‘Family man’ Mattocks ready for commitment

first_imgHelping Jamaica to a 2018 FIFA World Cup berth may be high on his agenda, but Reggae Boyz and Vancouver Whitecaps striker Darren Mattocks has other things on his mind these days. Mattocks, a former schoolboy star with Bridgeport High School, is looking forward to becoming a first-time father. The 25-year-old, who is currently in Jamaica on a break from his professional duties in the Major League Soccer (MLS), beamed with excitement as he confirmed the news. He noted that he is anxiously awaiting the birth of his firstborn, expected to be delivered later this year. “The child is not yet born,” a smiling Mattocks told Saturday Sports during a Red Stripe Premier League match between his former local club Waterhouse and Montego Bay United earlier this week. Clearly in high spirits, Mattocks, who has scored 12 goals in 31 appearances for the Reggae Boyz, says he feels absolutely ready for the commitment. “I think from a young age, I have been a responsible person as I have been living on my own since age 18,” said Mattocks. “As I get older, there are different things I want in life, and this is one of them. I’m looking forward to being a father for the first time,” Mattocks noted, while sharing a bit about his relationship with his significant other. “I’m with a special female. She is a wonderful person, someone to spend my life with, so I’m really excited. I know that I’m going to do a very good job. I take care of my entire family, so this (baby) is an extension,” he said. Mattock is a graduate of Bridgeport High in Portmore and also spent two years at Akron University in the United States. He was drafted into the MLS in 2012 and has represented Vancouver Whitecaps based in Canada since. He has made 93 appearances and scored 19 times for the MLS outfit.last_img read more

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DISAPPOINTMENT AS DONEGAL WALKER BOYCE DISQUALIFIED

first_imgMilford man Brendan Boyce’s World Championships have ended in disappointment after he was disqualified from the 50K walk in Beijing.Brendan BoyceThe Donegal man was going well right up until the 35 km mark when the incident happened.His team-mate, Rob Heffernan finished fifth overall in the walking race in a time of 3:44:17. DISAPPOINTMENT AS DONEGAL WALKER BOYCE DISQUALIFIED was last modified: August 29th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Commodities drive producer inflation

first_img30 July 2010The Producer Price Index (PPI) rose to 9.4% in June, 2.6 percentage points higher than the 6.8% recorded in May, according to Statistics South Africa (Stats SA).Some experts had predicted that PPI, which is the cost of goods leaving factory gates and mines, would come in at 7.7% year-on-year in June.Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) said on Thursday the increase could be explained by increases in the annual rate of change in price indices for agriculture, mining and quarrying as well as food and manufacturing.Seasonal price increasesNedbank economist Carmen Altenkirch said the sharp increase in the PPI was mainly due to a seasonal increase in the price of electricity.“Although PPI is expected to continue to rise over the coming months, it has no immediate implications for our positive consumer inflation outlook, as it is being driven by commodity inflation,” Altenkirch said.She added that price increases for manufactured goods would remain subdued.Rate cut hopesCommenting on Wednesday’s announcement that the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for June slowed to 4.2%, Altenkirch said: “The better-than-expected consumer inflation figure increased the chance that the South African Reserve Bank may decide to cut interest rates at the next meeting, particularly if the rand continues to strengthen.”Standard Bank economist Shireen Darmalingam said producer price increases picked up substantial pace in June, driven mostly by electricity price hikes as winter tariff pricing kicked in.“Further additional pressure is likely to be felt from this component in July,” said Darmalingam, who added that Thursday’s data had limited feed-through implications for consumer inflation down the line, and by extension interest rates.“We maintain that interest rate will remain on hold for the remainder of this year.”Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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Faster forensics, quicker prosecutions

first_img13 October 2010 The South African Police Service’s Forensic Science Laboratories have made a significant dent in their backlog, leading to more efficient prosecution and conviction of criminals in the country. Addressing journalists in Pretoria on Tuesday, Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa said the backlog of cases being handled by the Forensic Science Laboratories had decreased by 19% between 1 April 2009 and 31 March 2010. The backlog in ballistics had decreased by 39%, in biology investigation by 33%, and in questioned documents by 21%. Mthethwa attributed the success to the turnaround strategy that was implemented in forensics. The laboratories play a critical role in the prosecution and conviction of criminals. However, most of them were not functioning optimally. Court cases, depending on forensic evidence, were being delayed, lost or dropped. International experts have been assisting the South African Police Service in identifying the causes of the backlogs, and have developed remedial steps to resolve them. Since February this year, an overhaul of human resources and skills, and upgrading of equipment, was undertaken to improve capacity. “We are pleased with this progress, while also mindful that the current functioning of the Forensic Science Laboratories (FSL) is far from ideal,” Mthethwa said. “We shall continue to strive to ensure that we transform the FSL into a world-class unit.” Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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South Africa develops rooibos flavour wheel

first_imgRooibos is native to South Africa andis only grown in a small area in the Western Cape province. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more free photos, visit the image library) The rooibos flavour wheel is divided intopositive and negative tastes, and contains27 descriptive attributes. See a biggerversion. (Image: SA Rooibos Council) MEDIA CONTACTS • Professor Elizabeth JoubertAgricultural Research Council27 21 809 3444 RELATED ARTICLES • Rooibos yoghurt fights cancer • Rooibos gets a makeover • An infusion of innovation• Cadbury now Fairtrade certifiedWilma den HartighFor those of us who enjoy our daily rooibos cuppa, a good flavour is all-important. However, for the uninitiated it is only possible to distinguish basic flavour characteristics.Now, with the help of a newly developed rooibos flavour wheel, anyone can identify a full spectrum of tastes and aromas of this uniquely South African – and internationally popular – tea.The rooibos flavour wheel was developed by a group of South African researchers headed by Stellenbosch University (SU) Masters student Ilona Koch, who worked with Professor Elizabeth Joubert of the Agricultural Research Council and SU lecturer Nina Muller.“We thought it was time that someone develops a rooibos flavour wheel. We want producers, processors, grading experts, marketers, flavour houses, importers and consumers to all speak the same tea language,” Joubert says.Koch, who completed a BSc in Food Science at SU, was approached by a lecturer to get involved in the project. “I thought rooibos would be an interesting product to work with,” she says.The three-year project is jointly funded by the South African Rooibos Council and the Technology and Human Resources for Industry Programme.The rooibos wheel isn’t the first of its kind in the food and beverage industry. Products such as brandy, honey, wine and whisky already use flavour wheels, and the research team now hopes that the rooibos version will be a useful tool to help the industry assess rooibos flavour and aroma using a selection of specific descriptors.Koch says that the flavour wheel is also important for the industry as many people drink rooibos because of its taste. “I like the taste and I think that this is what draws people to it. It is also not as strong and astringent as black tea,” she says.The wheel offers 27 descriptive attributes, of which 20 describe the flavour and seven the taste and mouth-feel. Joubert says that just as the wine industry talks about an area’s viticulture terroir, or the sensory attributes of wine in relation to the environmental conditions where grapes grow, so too the growing area affects rooibos flavour nuances.Diversity of rooibos flavoursAccording to Koch, the research team carried out numerous experiments on rooibos tea to find out which sensory characteristics are typically associated with its flavour.The researchers, along with a panel of nine judges, spent a lot of time tasting rooibos tea. Koch says that most of the judges had prior experience with descriptive analysis of numerous products, but analysing the sensory qualities of rooibos tea was a first for them all.The team studied 69 distinct rooibos samples from 64 plantations in a number of production areas. Selecting samples from different production areas was important as rooibos flavour is influenced by where the crop grows, the soil type, rainfall and weather. Processing also plays a role, as the time taken to process tea leaves can cause the flavour to become watery or sour. “All these factors affect the taste, quality and composition of the tea,” Joubert says.The selected samples were graded from A to D, representing the highest to the lowest tea quality. “The tasters compiled a long list of the flavours they picked up,” Joubert says. The list was then reduced to the final selection. “We chose those descriptors that were found to be most useful to assess a tea.”Both negative and positive descriptors were recorded on the wheel. One half contains categories of positive sensory qualities such as sweet, fruity, floral, woody and spicy. Each category lists a few sub-descriptors such as honey, citrus or cinnamon. The negative descriptors are grouped in the same way and contain qualities such as dusty, sour, sweaty and rubbery.The tea tasting processIt was important that the tasting and tea-brewing process remained scientific and consistent at all times, to ensure that only the most accurate flavour descriptors made it onto the short list. The tea was brewed in 300g of boiling, deionised water, which was poured onto 5.8g of dry tea leaves and infused for five minutes.Each sample was strained and stored in a stainless steel flask to keep the temperature constant. At each tasting, members of the judging panel sipped 100ml of tea. The tea sample was served in a white porcelain cup and covered with a plastic lid to prevent evaporation and loss of volatiles, also known as aroma compounds. The cups were also preheated to 70º C, and stored in 65º C water baths during the analysis.The project, which is expected to run until March 2012, will keep the wheel updated with rooibos samples from later seasons. This is important, as even tea produced on the same land can vary in taste from season to season.“With the flavour wheel, you can pick up the most subtle differences in tea flavour and taste,” says Joubert.Proven health benefitsThe proven health benefits of rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) are encouraging more people to drink the tea. “Consumers are becoming much more aware of healthy lifestyles and rooibos tea is known for its many health benefits,” Koch says.The tea contains high levels of antioxidants, which help to eliminate damaging free radicals. Recently collaborating scientists from four international research facilities established clinical evidence that drinking rooibos regularly helps the body’s natural defences by enhancing its antioxidant capacity. Both traditional and green rooibos produced this effect.According to the Rooibos Council, South Africa produces approximately 12 000 tons of rooibos per year. South Africans consume 4 500 to 5 000 tons and the rest is exported.The growing global demand for rooibos has boosted exports to more than 6 000 tons per annum, and to more than 30 countries worldwide. This includes Germany, The Netherlands, Japan, the UK, and the US, which is the biggest importer of rooibos.last_img read more

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Freedom Park marks Women’s Month

first_img6 August 2013Women’s Month celebrations began at Freedom Park in Tshwane, the country’s capital, where the struggle for women’s emancipation and equality was commemorated with the theme “A centenary of working together towards sustainable women’s empowerment and gender equality”.Hundreds of women from different walks of life were at the event, where they formed a 2km human chain along Reconciliation Road. The road links the two historical memorials of Freedom Park and the Voortrekker Monument.“As we join hands in unity to form the human chain, let us remember what drove the women of 1913 and 1956 to leave their homes and come together against the injustices of that day,” Minister of Women, Children and People with Disabilities Lulu Xingwana said at the event on Friday.The injustices of today required women to form a united front to continue with the struggle for the total emancipation of women, she added.The idea of the human chain was initiated by Die Dameskring, a cultural organisation for Afrikaans-speaking Christian women who seek to make a difference in the communities in which they live.‘Awareness of modern day challenges’“We believe this initiative will not only bring awareness of the modern day challenges that women face, but also a better understanding of our history and the common goal of restoration and peace,” said Lynn Kruger, the executive officer of Die Dameskring.Homage was paid to women such as Charlotte Manye Maxeke, Sophie de Bruyn, Lillian Ngoyi, Helen Joseph and Rahima Moosa, who took part in the 1913 anti-pass defiance campaign – the first protest by black women against the Union government – and the 1956 march to the Union Buildings, respectively.“This year’s commemoration coincides with the centenary of the Land Act and the last year towards the 20 years democracy since 1994,” said Xingwana.The array of measures that were introduced in 1994 to promote female empowerment had improved the position and the condition of women in the country.Although women’s empowerment had grown, many things needed to be done to eradicate violence against women, poverty, unemployment and exploitation – “challenges and gaps are still there and are being attended to”, added Xingwana.Bishop Ellinah Wamukoya, the Anglican Bishop of Swaziland, was at the event and said: “The objective of this gathering is to highlight women’s abilities to come together and heal a nation.”Gender equalityXingwana announced that the Women Empowerment and Gender Equality Bill had been submitted to the Cabinet and was under consideration.The Bill would help to emancipate South African women fully from the plagues of discrimination and inequality. It aimed to monitor, evaluate and enforce all initiatives aimed at empowering the women of South Africa.It focused on vital issues affecting women and children and sought to establish a framework that would provide women, children and people with disabilities with the necessary governance authority to monitor, review and oversee gender mainstreaming and integration, the minister explained. The bill would provide for a number of issues, namely:Eliminating every form of discrimination against women and girls as well as women and girls with disabilities Promoting equal participation of women in the economy  Promoting equal representation as well as 50 percent position in decision-making in private sectors as well as spheres of government  Initiating and joining in partnership for a common goal  Monitoring of legislation that address inequalities, discrimination against women, violence against women, access to services and economic empowerment. “Cabinet’s approval of the Women Empowerment and Gender Equality Bill will be an important milestone for the struggle for gender equality in our country,” said Xingwana, who added that the department was satisfied that its drive towards female empowerment and gender equality would finally be fulfilled.The Department of Land Reform and Rural Development has also made a commitment that will ensure that women have access to land.Celebrating Women’s MonthThis year marks a century since the 8 May 1913 Natives Land Act was passed.Among others, it deprived women of access to land. In 1913, the colonial government legislated that women living in the urban townships would be required to buy new entry permits allowing them to be in the towns each month.In response, women collected thousands of signatures and organised petitions to stop this law.Charlotte Maxeke, a religious leader, social worker and political activist, as well as South Africa’s first black African female graduate, led about 700 women in a march to the Bloemfontein City Council to petition the mayor to overturn the law.South African History Online explains the Act: “The Natives Land Act (No. 27 of 1913), also known as the Black Land Act, was passed because of constant pressure by Whites to prevent the encroachment of Blacks on White areas.“This law incorporated territorial segregation into legislation for the first time since Union in 1910. The law created reserves for Blacks and prohibited the sale of White territory to Blacks and vice versa.”National Women’s Day is observed on 9 August annually, in remembrance of the 1956 Women’s March in Pretoria. This year, the national commemoration will take place in Thulumahashe in Mpumalanga.Xingwana said that the month would be used to bring to the fore programmes that would help to eliminate gender-based violence against women and children.The minister also acknowledged women in South Africa who held high positions in business and government.Among those mentioned was former deputy president Phumzile Mlambo Ngcuka, who is now the executive director of United Nations Women and is based in New York, as well as Nkosazana Zuma, who is the chairperson of the African Union.BrandSouthAfrica reporterlast_img read more

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Fitbit confident smartwatch will arrive on time, despite rumors of delays

first_imgInternet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Related Posts David Curry Fitbit’s next smartwatch is “on track” to launch at the end of this year, according to chief executive James Park, who denied the multiple rumors of delays.In an interview with the Financial Times, Park said the smartwatch will be the company’s best yet, sporting “industry leading” GPS performance, a music player, and new biometric sensors that may find use in the medical industry, if Fitbit receives FDA approval.See Also: Study hints that wearables are terrible at counting calories, just like their usersOne thing that won’t be in the next Fitbit is cellular options, which Park says requires too many tradeoffs, the most important being battery life.Even though Fitbit has one of the better records for accuracy, in a report last year the Apple Watch was deemed far more accurate when it came to heart-rate and high-intensity exercise. The improved GPS may help reduce inaccuracies, alongside the new sensors.Customers say “Where’s my jam?”The company has also been hounded by customers that want to control music through the fitness tracker. The acquisition of Pebble late last year has helped them add third-party applications to the new wearable, according to Park.Entering into the medical market has been rumored for a few months, and Park confirmed the company’s intentions: “Getting approved by the FDA and going down that pathway is something we wholeheartedly embrace. The exciting thing about larger form-factor devices is it allows us to have those capabilities and unlock them over time.”Fitbit is in a tricky situation, if the FDA approval doesn’t come in and the smartwatch doesn’t work wonders, it could be seen as same old to Wall Street. The company’s stock has halved in the past year, and it recently lost its position as the most popular wearable manufacturer, now third behind Apple and Xiaomi.center_img Follow the Puck Tags:#biometric#FDA#Fitbit#fitness tracker#GPS#smartwatch Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to…last_img read more

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Three killed on suspicion of witchcraft

first_imgThree persons — a couple and 77-year-old woman — were allegedly killed on suspicion of witchcraft in the Gunupur police station area of Odisha’s Rayagada district.All the three — Gopal Sabar, his wife Laxmi Sabar and Jakili Sabar — residents of Ukumbaguda village, had been missing since February 23. The couple’s daughter, Sabita Sabar, had filed an FIR with the police saying that her parents and the aged woman were murdered by some villagers who accused them to be practitioners of witchcraft.On receiving the information, a police team led by Gunupur Sub-Divisional Police Officer Rajkishor Dash reached the spot along with a scientific team and a sniffer dog. The police have detained four persons in connection with the incident.Mr Dash said initial probe hints that the three were beaten to death and their bodies burnt on February 23 night. Their charred remains were thrown in a pond.last_img read more

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ED to probe financial set up of Speak Asia

first_imgThe Enforcement Directorate (ED) would begin a probe into the financial set up of Singapore-based online survey company Speak Asia. The development comes about a month after Headlines Today blew the lid off the controversial company. The ED would investigate the money flow of Speak Asia and how it collected crores of rupees from 19 lakh Indian investors through various entities, opened accounts in Indian banks and than transferred the money to Haren Ventures Ltd in Singapore. Haren Ventures is the front company, owned by Speak Asia CEO Harender Kaur. ED would track the flow of money to find out if the company was involved in money laundering. Speak Asia was in the spotlight recently for giving more than 500 per cent return to investors violating the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) rules. It had also violated RBI norms by collecting crores of rupees from gullible investors and transacting abroad without a head office in India. The ministry of corporate affairs had earlier said that it could not investigate Speak Asia because the company was not registered in India and the ministry did not have the company’s database. Singapore-based United Overseas Bank had closed the bank accounts of Speak Asia following the Headlines Today expose last month. Speak Asia however said on Tuesday that it had not received any intimation about the ED probe. In a statement, the company said: “We are yet to receive any intimation, notice, letter or questionnaire from the Enforcement Directorate or any other wing or department of any government agency/authority.” “As stated previously, we would like to reiterate that we will extend our fullest cooperation to any agency that approaches us for any investigation. Speak Asia is committed to the growth and prosperity of its panellists in India and is here to stay,” the statement added.advertisementFor more news on India, click here.For more news on Business, click here.For more news on Movies, click here.For more news on Sports, click here.last_img read more

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